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1  Keil, Eva Elisabeth (I2092)
 
2  Johann, Johann Michael (I5319)
 
3  Kisselman, Matthias (I5787)
 
4

Individual:
Baptism certificate said Herringhausen, which is about 3 miles WSW of Lippstadt, probably born Herringhausendorf, which is about 3 miles east of Enger and less than a mile south of Oetinghausen.23 Nov 200213:50:05One more child, 11 born, 7 living in 1900 census21 Apr 200221:14:20
Title: Records of Evangelical Lutheran Church, Enger, GER
Date: 23 Nov 2002

Clare Sentinal - 9 Sept 1910
HERMAN SNEAR
Herman Snear was born in Germany 3 July 1836 and came to this
country in 1857, settling in Erie, PA. In 1861 he was married to MissConey NITZEL who was also a native of Germany. Their married lifeextended over a period of 39 years, the wife dying in Oct 1900. In1867 they moved to Michigan, settling in Tuscola Co, where theyresided until 1883 when they came to Wise, Isabella Co, where theylived until the death summons came. To them were born ten children,six boys and four girls. Three of the boys, Charlie, Joseph and John, diedbefore the parents. There still survive three sons, George, William andFrank, who reside in Wise. All the daughters are still living: Mrs. Wm.LEOSH and Mrs. James HERSEY of Wise, Mrs. Len WOOD or Gilmore,and Mrs. Wm. JOHNSON of Farwell.
Mr. SNEAR was a member of the GAR, having volunteered for his
adopted country in 1861 and followed the flag for three years.
Since the death of his wife, he had resided with his son George. On
Sunday last he seemed in his usual health and had spent part of the dayvisiting at another son's. When he returned home he lay down uponthe bed and was there found dead, the end coming evidently without astruggle.
The funeral was held at the ME Church in Loomis, services being
conducted by Rev. PARSONS of Coleman, and interment in cemetery atLoomis. The very large attendance at the funeral attested the worth ofthe deceased and the high esteem in which he was held.Date: 23 Nov 2002
 
Snear, Herman Heinrich (I835)
 
5 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I213)
 
6
 
Griswold, Mary (I238)
 
7
 
Irish, Jedediah (I342)
 
8
 
Irish, John (I347)
 
9
 
Irish, Mary Jane (I369)
 
10
 
Phelps, Norman (I624)
 
11
 
Phelps, Timothy (I651)
 
12
 
Phelps, William (I654)
 
13
 
Schultz, Ida Muriel (I777)
 
14
 
Storrs, Charles Frederick (I854)
 
15
 
Shawl, Daniel H (I1381)
 
16
 
Osborn, John (I2274)
 
17
 
Pratt, Mary Ann (I3722)
 
18
 
Martin, Ann Rhodes (I3991)
 
19
 
Irish, Clarence (I5066)
 
20
 
Shultz, Eve (I5118)
 
21
 
Johann, Johann Michael (I5319)
 
22
 
Baumgaertner, Johannes (I6875)
 
23
 
Family F254
 
24
Death Info for Sally IRISH
herb211 (View posts) Posted: 8 Sep 2004 7:42PM GMT

Classification: Query
Surnames: IRISH
I have a death date of February 17, 1879 in Groveland, Oakland, Co. MI.. Sally was the wife of David Irish who died January 08, 1855 in Ortonville, MI.

Can anyone verify this for me? TIA 
Phelps, Sally (I636)
 
25
From MayflowerHistory.com:

John Howland was born about 1599, probably in Fenstanton, Huntington. He came on the Mayflower in 1620 as a manservant of Governor John Carver. During the Mayflower's voyage, Howland fell overboard during a storm, and was almost lost at sea--but luckily for his millions of descendants living today (including Presidents George Bush and George W. Bush, and Mrs. Theodore Roosevelt) he managed to grab hold of the topsail halyards, giving the crew enough time to rescue him with a boat-hook.

It has been traditionally reported that John Howland was born about 1592, based on his reported age at death in the Plymouth Church Records. However, ages at death were often overstated, and that is clearly the case here. John Howland came as a servant for John Carver, which means he was under 25 years old at the time (i.e. he was born after 1595). William Bradford, in the falling-overboard incident, refers to Howland as a "lusty young man," a term that would not likely have applied to a 28-year old given that Bradford himself was only 30. Bradford did call 21-year old John Alden a "young man" though. Howland's wife Elizabeth was born in 1607: a 32-year old marrying a 17-year old is a relatively unlikely circumstance. Howland's last child was born in 1649: a 57-year old Howland would be an unlikely father. All these taken together demonstrate that Howland's age was likely overstated by at least 5 years. Since he signed the "Mayflower Compact", we can assume he was probably at least 18 to 21 years old in 1620.

John Howland had several brothers who also came to New England, namely Henry Howland (an ancestor to both Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford) and Arthur Howland (an ancestor to Winston Churchill). 
Howland, John (I5162)
 
26
From Scots-Irish in Va.-Vol-2: David Caruthers filed a marriage bond to Elizabeth Jackson, dau of David Jackson on 14 March 1786.

From Virginia Marriages to 1800: David Caruthers married Elizabeth Jackson on 18 March 1786 in Augusta County, Virginia.

From Virginia Bond, Marriage, Probate Records 1639-1850: The will of David Caruthers dated 25 May 1810 in Augusta County, Virginia mentions wife Elizabeth, sons John and James and oldest daughter Jean. Book WB12-164 Prove Date 27 May 1816

From his obituary John Caruthers was born in Augusta County, Virginia 4 July 1793.

Therefore, we know that David of Augusta County, Virginia had a son named John sometime after 1786. We know that our John was born 4 Jul 1793 in Augusta County, Virginia. But is there any information to show that they are the same person?

After studying Census and Tax lists for Augusta County (details follow) it would appear that there were at most two Caruthers families in Augusta County-The David Caruthers family and the Thomas Caruthers family. We do not see another John as a head of household. Therefore, it would appear likely that there was only one John in Augusta County during this time period.

1790 US Census: Unfortunately the Virginia census records for this year is missing. A reconstructed Tax list for 1790 http://www.binnsgenealogy.com/VirginiaTaxListCensuses/ shows David Caruthers in Augusta County.

1800 US Census: Unfortunately the Virginia census records for this year is missing. A reconstructed Tax list for 1800 http://www.binnsgenealogy.com/VirginiaTaxListCensuses/ shows David Caruthers in Augusta County and Thomas Caruthers in Augusta County.

1810 US Census: David Caruthers in Augusta and Thomas Careathers in Augusta

1820 US Census: Elizabeth Caruthers in Stanton, Augusta County and John Careathers in Waynesboro, Augusta County. (1 male 26-44 and 1 female 26-44 is consistent with his just marrying Nancy Brown earlier in 1820.)

The date of birth of all of David's children is not known. However David's will shows two sons, the eldest born 1786 and one eldest daughter, Jean, birth unknown. He mentions the other daughters would receive bequests as they come of age. Which would imply they were born after 1794, as the will is dated 1810. So, if James was the oldest child, David's birth date was probably 1766 or before. Which means he was aged at least 50 or more when he died in 1816. This would change to an older age if Jean was the oldest child or if he had started having children later in life.
 
Caruthers, David (I4001)
 
27
How do we know that William Irish of Fairgrove Township is the son of Sally Phelps?

Most of our basic information comes from the book by Willis L Irish, “Descendants of John Irish The Immigrant 1629-1963” The full contents of this book can be accessed online at:



According to Willis Irish, Sally Phelps married David Irish; they had 12 children and in 1837 moved to Groveland Township in Oakland County, Michigan. Eight sons and 2 daughters came with them. William was the 10th of 12 children, born 1834 in Fort Ann, New York.

According to Willis Irish, William was married to Polly. They settled in Fairgrove Township and had the following children: Alfred 1862, Sophronia 1867, Mary 1870, Nellie 1873 and Ida 1876. Willis Irish notes that he later remarried to Henrietta between 1876 and 1880. We know that Willis was incorrect on the Polly marriage. A simple review of the census records for 1860, 1870 and 1880 shows William was married to Henrietta. Birth records of Ida and Mary on file with the Tuscola County clerk show Henrietta as the mother. I have not yet found birth records on the other children. The census records for 1850, 1860 and 1870 do show a Polly Irish living in the same household with William. It also shows Polly as 22 years his senior and not as his spouse. My suspicion is Polly is an older sister. Willis does list a Polly born 1832 as a child of David and Sally Irish, but to match with the census information Polly would have to have been born in 1812. Polly remains a question mark, but she very definitely was not Williams’s wife. But in spite of the Polly Irish error all of the information in Willis Irish’s book matches our William Irish.

Sally’s last two children being born in 1843 and in 1846 when Sally was aged 57 and 60. Herb Phelps (a Phelps family researcher) reports that David and Sally were divorced on November 15, 1847 and that she died in Groveland Township on February 17, 1879. The 1850 Census shows David Irish married to Delilah Irish and there are no children living with them. I do not find Sally on the 1850 Census, although I do find her on the 1860 and 1870 Census living with her son Liberty B Irish.

Sally is most likely the person referenced in the quintuplets story. Here is a quote from a Herb Phelps message board post:

“(There was an article in the The Washington Post of March 10, 1808; "The wife of David IRISH of Westfield (Now Fort Ann, Washington Co. NY.)was delivered of five children, two sons and three daughters. They were alive when born , but died in a few hours. They altogether weighed seven pounds and five ounces." Note of this event was also made in the 1810 Census of Queensbury, Warren Co. NY.)
David's wife was Sally PHELPS daughter of Norman PHELPS Sr. of Fort Ann, Washington Co. NY. born July 31, 1785 in Hebron, Tolland Co. CT. They moved to Michigan in 1837 and David & Sally were divorced on November 15, 1847.
Sally died in Groveland, Oakland Co. MI on February 17, 1879”

Another reference:

“David Irish, with a wife and three children, was the last family listed in the 1810 census of Queenbury, Washington County, New York. At the bottom of the page, the census-taker wrote a footnote concerning David's wife as follows: 'This woman is 24 years old and has had 10 children, 5 of which were born at one and the same time.' This may be the first instance of quintuplets recorded in this country."
Printed in National Genealogical Society Quarterly, June 1965, Vol. 53.”

I have attached an image from the 1810 Census, with an asterisk in the David Irish column and a note below which says exactly what the above reference stated.

Some more references concerning this event:

The number of children caught our eye, so we looked at the family. The note is really there, and does appear to be marked for David.

The Irish families living in Queensbury in 1810 are:
Amos Irish
Andrew Irish
Benjamin Irish
David Irish
Jonathan Irish

There is an extremely well presented website for the Irish family at:
http://lthome.com/genealogy/

We copied the following information from there:
Benjamin Irish
Birth , 16 Mar 1749/50 , S. Kingston, Washington, RI
Father , Joseph Irish, b. 20 Apr 1724, S. Kingston, Washington Co., RI
Mother , Dorcas (Irish)
Group Sheet , F0918

1. Andrew Irish, b. BET 1765 AND 1784
2. David Irish, b. 23 Jan 1783
3. Amos Irish, b. 1786, Amenia, Dutchess, NY
4. Jonathan Irish, b. 27 Jul 1789, Warren or Washington Co., NY

This looks like the family.

It should be noted that though the census says that Mrs Irish had 10 kids, only 3 are living with them.

If this is true that Sally had ten children by 1810, only 1 of the children listed by Willis Irish in his book was born before 1810. That would mean 21 children!!!! With the last born at age 60. It seems only fair to ask a few questions. Was Sally really the wife who had the quintuplets? Was Sally really having children at age 60? I cannot answer the first question, but I can answer the second.

Job Irish born in 1843 is listed as the 11th child in Willis’s book. He is given id# 3493 in the book. But, reviewing the book we see that Sally’s son Liberty B had a son, also in 1843, also named Job who is id#3499 in the book. It seems odd that the same name would be duplicated not only in the same generation, but in the same year by close relatives living in the same Township. We have not seen this in the family before. The census records for 1850 show only 1 Job Irish and he is living with Liberty B Irish, not David or Sally. I have found the Oakland County Death Record for Job Irish. He died January 19, 1871 at the age of 27y 11m 6d, which would give a DOB of February 3, 1843. The death record shows he was born and died in Groveland Township of consumption. It lists parents of Liberty B and Jane Irish of Michigan. Based on the above information I conclude that Willis Irish was incorrect and that child number 11 was actually a grand child, the son of Liberty B and Sarah Jane Irish.

Norman Irish born in 1846 is listed as the 12th child in Willis’s book. He is given id# 3494 in the book. Willis lists the following information for Norman P: born 7-29-1846 died 9-9-1856, son of J.R. and S.J (we will see what this means, shortly) a footnote states buried in Ortonville Cemetery, Groveland Township, Oakland, Michigan. Reviewing the book we see that Liberty B Irish also had a child Norman P id# 3500 born in 1844 and died in 1915. Again, I find it odd that close relatives living close together would reuse the same name so quickly. A review of the Census records shows only one Norman Irish and he is living with Liberty J. We consult the Ortonville Cemetery Inscriptions copied by Merle Perry Jr in July of 1964. We see only one Norman buried there. The listing reads Irish, Norman P s/o LB & SJ died 9/9/1856 age 10y 1m 10d. s/o means ‘son of’ according to the books abbreviation guide. The age translates to DOB of 7/29/1846. The DOB and DOD match with Willis’s listing for Norman P, son of David and Sally. But, s/o LB & SJ means son of Liberty B and Sarah J. Willis had by some kind of typo translated LB to JR. Based on the above, I conclude that child number 12 was actually a grand child, the son of Liberty B and Sarah Jane Irish.

Therefore, William was the last child of David & Sally Irish. Unfortunately his death record does not list his parents and I have no source records to show Sally as William’s mother. So for now, we must rely on Willis Irish to show William’s parentage.

I have also ordered the complete Civil War pension file records of William Irish from the National Archives. We know he applied for a pension, but we do not know if he received one. If he did, there should be some interesting personal information on file. NARA (the National Archives) says 60 to 120 days to receive anything, or nothing if that is the case.
 
Irish, William W (I392)
 
28
IRISH, SOPHIA

Date of death: 21-May-1878
Ledger Page: 261
Record Number: 3
Place of death: Pontiac City
County of Death: Oakland
Sex: Female
Race: White
Marital Status: Divorced
Age: 69 years 4 months
Cause of Death: inflammation of lungs
Birthplace: New York
Occupation: housewife
Father's Name: Last name not recorded,
Father's Residence: Michigan
Mother's Name: ,
Mother's Residence: Michigan
Date of record: 30-Jun-1879
 
Jenks, Sophia (I1196)
 
29
JUNIATA

This town is bounded on the north by Fair Grove, having Denmark on the west, Vassar to the south and Indian Fields east. Cass River flows through the southeast corner of the town, about three sections lying to the south and east of the river. The most of the town is rolling; about one-third perhaps, in the southeast corner, along the river, being level and having a more sandy soil than the other two-thirds, which is generally a clay loam.
This was among the earliest settled towns in the county. The first settlers in the town were Levi Rogers and family, who came in early in 1850. The first blow struck for improvement was by Andrew Jackson Rogers on land which his father had purchased of Townsend North. From Levi Rogers the town took the name of Rogers under which it was organized.
Shortly after came two German families, and about the same time William Jameson, Jonas Belknap, Ezra A. Belknap, John Freeman, S. H. Moore, Daniel Gorton Truman, and within the next two years Patrick McGlone, Ephraim Smith, Frank Fairhan, Daniel Kinyon, King Allen, Hiram Gibbs, Lucius Marvin, James Wing, Henry S. Russell, William Law, Andrew Schultz, Nelson Vickery, William Fenner, Daniel T. Tonkrey, E. Miller, R. G. Black.
Until 1852 the only roads were the lumberman’s supply and logging roads, very serviceable in winter but almost impassable in spring and summer. In 1852 a road was laid out from the present site of Watrousville which was cut through in 1853, the people generally turning out and helping to open the road. The commissioners to lay out this road were Jackson Rogers and William Jameson. Martin Miller, of Tuscola, was surveryor.

http://www.interment.net/data/us/mi/tuscola/watrous/index.htm
Shults, Andrew, d. 18 Jan 1873, 63y 3m 14d, marker gone

WILL NOTES:
I Andrew Shults of Juniata in the County of Tuscola in the State of Michigan being of sound mind and memory do make and declare this my last will and testament in manner following: That is to say I give and devise unto my daughter Hannah Lucia Shults of my farm the following described plat of land: namely the north half and the south east 1/4 of the north east quarter of section 10 in township 12 north of range 8 east in the county of Tuscola and State of Michigan to have and to hold this said lands ( ) and ( )with ( ) appurtenance to her said Hannah Lucia Shults her heirs and assigns forever. It is my will that the remainder of my said farm and my personal possessions be sold in a reasonable time and at a reasonable price for the payment of all of my just debts and funeral expenses and that the personal property shall be sold and disposed of by my brother-in-law Gearhart Kile and that the real estate namely the south west quarter of the northeast quarter----------------------------------------aforesaid be sold by my executor . I do hereby appoint my friend John Cole executor of this my last will and testament and also appoint him guardian of my said daughter and only child.
-------------------whereof I have herein sat my hand and seal this fourteenth day of January in the year of our lord one thousand eight hundred and seventy three.

Signed with his mark. Andrew Shults.

The above instrument consisting of one sheet was now here subscribed by Andrew Shults the testator in the presence of each of us and was at the same time declared by him to be his last will and testament; and we at his request signed our names herein as attesting witnesses.

Samuel H York residing in Juniata County of Tuscola
Mattie A Brittain residing in Juniata County of Tuscola

(NOTE: the spelling of his name Shults instead of Shultz)
 
Shultz, Andrew (I807)
 
30 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I1452)
 
31
Some on-line trees shows Samuel's parents as Joshua Allen and Mary Crowell. But this is disproved by NEHGR 1971 P232-233-"Yelverton Crowell of Yarmouth, Mass." According to cemetery inscriptions from "History of Ancient Windham" the family plot shows their son Samuel died at Coventy, Ct 14 Oct 1718; whereas our Samuel was having children in Lebanon Ct until 1729 thus proving that these are different persons.

Many other on-line genealogies show this Samuel Allen marrying Lydia Hastings, dau of John Seaborne Hastings. But the children do not match up. So that is incorrect also.

I am unable to find a birth record for Yarmouth, Barnstable, Massachusetts in 1675 as many on-line genealogies show. So I do not have a verified place of birth or date of birth.

I believe that the family originated in Westerly, with the first five children being born in Westerly. The first 5 children are Mary, Catherine, Elizabeth, Joshua and Samuel who are all recorded in the Westerly records.

At some point between 1717 and 1724 the family moved to Stonington. Perhaps at that point the older births from Westerly records were added to Stonington. From the records of the First Congregation Church in Stonington, we show the following baptisms:

On 2 Aug 1724 Catherine Allen was admitted into the church.
On 30 Aug 1724 the following children of Samuel Allen were baptized; Elizabeth, Joshua, Samuel and Thomas. (Thomas is a new child, whom we do not have a date of birth)
On 8 Nov 1724 Catherine Allen, an adult was baptized.
On 28 Mar 1725 Samuel Allen was admitted into full communion.
On 29 Aug 1725, John Allen son of Samuel was baptized.
On 17 Nov 1728 Eunice Allen dau of Samuel was baptized.
On 14 Sep 1729 ruhameh Allen dau of Samuel was baptized.

These last 3 children are new children who, like Thomas, are not recorded in the Barbour collection. We assume that unlike the previous older children all baptized on the same day, that these children were baptized shortly after birth. As to whether Thomas was a new child or older child, we do not know. But it does seem clear that this family going to the Stonington Church is the same family as the one showing the births in Westerly.

We now have an approximate date for when the family moved to Lebanon from the following record of the First Congregation Church in Stonington dated 22 Mar 1730/1731:
Samuel Allen and Catherine his wife were recommended to ye communion of ye 2d Church of Christ in Lebanon.

Thus we conclude that the family moved to Lebanon approximately 1730 to 1731. The book “Fairfield” has the family living in Lebanon by 1735. And we know that Elizabeth Allen married Samuel Dewey in 1732 in Lebanon.

We also have an on-line genealogy (unconfirmed) which shows 3 additional children (in addition to the children listed above) born in Lebanon 1733, 1735 and 1737; Joseph, Daniel and George. These children also are not listed in the Barbour collection. 
Allen, Samuel (I3592)
 
32
State: Michigan
County: Tuscola
Volume: 4
Page: 127
Rec #: 164
Date:
Groom: Walter (J?) Schultz
Bride: Florence (G?) Murdy
Groom age: 20
Bride age: 17
Groom race: W
Bridge Race: W
Groom Residence: Fairgrove
Bride Residence: Fairgrove
Groom Place of Birth: Mich
Bride Place of Birth: Mich
Groom Occ: Farmer
Bride Occ:
Groom Father: Joseph Schultz
Bride Father: Mr. Murdy
Groom Mother: Sarah Phelps
Bride Mother: not given
Groom prev marr: 0
Bride prev marr: 0
Date of Marriage: Sept 18, 1894
Place of Marriage: Caro
Official: Alexander Reynick, Justice of the Peace
Witness: William Schultz of Fairgrove
Witness: Eunice Schultz of Fairgrove
 
Family F224
 
33
Title: Clare Sentinal - 9 Sept 1910
Text: HERMAN SNEAR

Herman Snear was born in Germany 3 July 1836 and came to this country in 1857, settling in Erie, PA. In 1861 he was married to Miss Coney NITZEL who was also a native of Germany. Their married life extended over a period of 39 years, the wife dying in Oct 1900. In1867 they moved to Michigan, settling in Tuscola Co, where theyresided until 1883 when they came to Wise, Isabella Co, where the ylived until the death summons came. To them were born ten children,six boys and four girls. Three of the boys, Charlie, Joseph and John, diedbefore the parents. There still survive three sons, George, William and Frank, who reside in Wise. All the daughters are still living: Mrs. Wm.LEOSH and Mrs. James HERSEY of Wise, Mrs. Len WOOD or Gilmore,and Mrs. Wm. JOHNSON of Farwell.
Mr. SNEAR was a member of the GAR, having volunteered for his adopted country in 1861 and followed the flag for three years.
Since the death of his wife, he had resided with his son George. On Sunday last he seemed in his usual health and had spent part of the dayvisiting at another son's. When he returned home he lay down uponthe bed and was there found dead, the end coming evidently without a struggle.
The funeral was held at the ME Church in Loomis, services being conducted by Rev. PARSONS of Coleman, and interment in cemetery atLoomis. The very large attendance at the funeral attested the worth of the deceased and the high esteem in which he was held.Date: 23 Nov 2002
 
Nitzel, Coney (I498)
 
34
Werdorf churchbook shows Johann Georg Henrich born 31 Jan 1729 to Hans Kaspar Henrich and Anna Christina Zimmerman. It also shows his marriage with Anna Elisabeth Rupp born 12 Mar 1729 to Johann Philip Rupp and Anna Elisabeth Dietz. 
Rupp, Anna Elisabeth (I5774)
 
35 "Ancestors and descendants of Jonathan Abell" by Horace Abell pub 1933 gives Isabelle Keller as the wife of the immigrant Thomas Morehouse Unknown, Isabel (I4488)
 
36 "Michigan Digital Archive Collection", State of Michigan, Archives of Michigan Digital Collections (http://haldigitalcollections.cdmhost.com/cdm4/search.php). Source (S531)
 
37 "Michigan Digital Archive Collection". Images and Transcrioptions. State of Michigan. Archives of Michigan Digital Collections. http://haldigitalcollections.cdmhost.com/cdm4/search.php : Death Records 1897-1920. Source (S236)
 
38 "now since 29 years, and has not had a child, 11/3/1660" NEHGS 1851 V5 P230 Wilson, Isabel (I1639)
 
39 #50 Spring/Summer 2010 pdf at http://lounsbury-tree.blogspot.com/ Source (S353)
 
40 <i>1841 Census Returns</i>. London, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO). HO 107 Census Returns. Source (S641)
 
41 <i>California, San Francisco Area Funeral Home Records, 1835-1931</i>. Salt Lake City, Utah: FamilySearch, 2013. Source (S524)
 
42 <i>Census Returns of England and Wales, 1841</i>. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1841. Data imaged from the National Archives, London, England. The National Archives gives no warranty as to the accuracy, completeness or fitness for the purpose of the information provided. Images may be used only for purposes of research, private study or education. Applications for any other use should be made to the National Archives, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 4DU. Source (S584)
 
43 <i>Census Returns of England and Wales, 1851</i>. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1851. Data imaged from the National Archives, London, England. The National Archives gives no warranty as to the accuracy, completeness or fitness for the purpose of the information provided. Images may be used only for purposes of research, private study or education. Applications for any other use should be made to the National Archives, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 4DU. Source (S586)
 
44 <i>Census Returns of England and Wales, 1861</i>. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1861. Data imaged from The National Archives, London, England. The National Archives gives no warranty as to the accuracy, completeness or fitness for the purpose of the information provided. Images may be used only for purposes of research, private study or education. Applications for any other use should be made to The National Archives, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 4DU. Source (S639)
 
45 <i>Census Returns of England and Wales, 1871</i>. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1871. Data imaged from the National Archives, London, England. The National Archives gives no warranty as to the accuracy, completeness or fitness for the purpose of the information provided. Images may be used only for purposes of research, private study or education. Applications for any other use should be made to the National Archives, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 4DU. Source (S634)
 
46 <i>Census Returns of England and Wales, 1881</i>. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1881. <p>Images © Crown copyright. Images reproduced by courtesy of The National Archives, London, England.</p> <p>The National Archives give no warranty as to the accuracy, completeness or fitness for the purpose of the information provided.</p> <p>Images may be used only for purposes of research, private study or education. Applications for any other use should be made to <a href="http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/imagelibrary/" target="_blank">The National Archives Image Library</a>, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 4DU, Tel: 020 8392 5225 Fax: 020 8392 5266.</p> Source (S633)
 
47 <i>Census Returns of England and Wales, 1891</i>. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1891. <p>Data imaged from The National Archives, London, England. 2,131 rolls. The National Archives gives no warranty as to the accuracy, completeness or fitness for the purpose of the information provided. Images may be used only for purposes of research, private study or education. Applications for any other use should be made to The National Archives, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 4DU.</p> Source (S636)
 
48 <i>Census Returns of England and Wales, 1901</i>. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives, 1901. Data imaged from the National Archives, London, England. The National Archives gives no warranty as to the accuracy, completeness or fitness for the purpose of the information provided. Images may be used only for purposes of research, private study or education. Applications for any other use should be made to the National Archives, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 4DU. Source (S640)
 
49 <i>Church of England Parish Registers, 1538-1812</i>. London, England: London Metropolitan Archives. <p>Images produced by permission of the City of London Corporation Libraries, Archives. The City of London gives no warranty as to the accuracy, completeness or fitness for the purpose of the information provided. Images may be used only for purposes of research, private study or education. Applications for any other use should be made to the City of London, Guildhall, PO Box 270, London, EC2P 2EJ. Infringement of the above condition may result in legal action.</p> Source (S620)
 
50 <i>Find A Grave</i>. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi. Source (S501)
 
51 <i>Find A Grave</i>. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi: accessed 1 February 2013. Source (S598)
 
52 <i>Find A Grave</i>. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi: accessed 1 February 2013. Source (S606)
 
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54 <i>Find A Grave</i>. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi: accessed 25 January 2013. Source (S655)
 
55 <i>Find A Grave</i>. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi: accessed 4 February 2013. Source (S654)
 
56 <i>Germany, Marriages, 1558-1929</i>. Salt Lake City, Utah: FamilySearch, 2013. Source (S549)
 
57 <i>Historic Pennsylvania Church and Town Records</i>. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Historical Society of Pennsylvania. <p><i>Methodist Church Records</i>. Valley Forge, Pennsylvania: Eastern Pennsylvania United Methodist Church Commission on Archives and History.</p> Source (S596)
 
58 <i>Iowa, Marriages</i>. Salt Lake City, Utah: FamilySearch, 2013. Source (S644)
 
59 <i>Missouri Marriage Records</i>. Jefferson City, MO, USA: Missouri State Archives. Microfilm. Source (S645)
 
60 <i>Records of the Internal Revenue Service. </i>Record Group 58. The National Archives at Washington, DC. <p><a href="/search/dbextra.aspx?dbid=1264">See Full Source Citations</a>.</p> Source (S608)
 
61 <i>Rochester City Directory, 1890</i>. Rochester, NY, USA: R. L. Polk Co., 1890. Source (S621)
 
62 <i>Selected Passenger and Crew Lists and Manifests</i>. National Archives, Washington, D.C.<p><a href="/search/dbextra.aspx?dbid=7949">View all sources</a>.</p> Source (S618)
 
63 <i>Selected Passenger and Crew Lists and Manifests</i>. National Archives, Washington, D.C.<p><br>A full list of sources can be found <a href="/search/dbextra.aspx?dbid=8722">here</a>.</p> Source (S576)
 
64 <i>Selected Passports</i>. National Archives, Washington, D.C.<p><br>A full list of sources can be found <a href="/search/dbextra.aspx?dbid=1174">here</a>.</p> Source (S612)
 
65 <i>The Charles R. Hale Collection</i>. <i>Hale Collection of Connecticut Cemetery Inscriptions.</i> Hartford, Connecticut: Connecticut State Library. Source (S657)
 
66 <i>The Dayton Obituary Index</i>. Dayton Metro Library. http://www.daytonmetrolibrary.org/hobits-search: accessed 13 November 2013. Source (S504)
 
67 <i>The Obituary Daily Times</i>. The Obituary Daily Times. http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~obituary. Source (S574)
 
68 <i>U.S. Census Mortality Schedules, New York, 1850-1880.</i> Microfilm, M1-M15, 15 rolls. New York State Education Department, Office of Cultural Education. New York State Library, Albany, New York. Source (S656)
 
69 <i>Voter Registration Lists, Public Record Filings, Historical Residential Records, and Other Household Database Listings</i>. Source (S637)
 
70 <i>Voter Registration Lists, Public Record Filings, Historical Residential Records, and Other Household Database Listings</i>. Source (S652)
 
71 <i>Warwickshire Anglican Registers</i>. Warwick, England: Warwickshire County Record Office. Source (S658)
 
72 <p><i>Consolidated Lists of Civil War Draft Registrations, 1863-1865</i>. NM-65, entry 172, 620 volumes. Records of the Provost Marshal General’s Bureau (Civil War), Record Group 110. National Archives, Washington D.C.</p> Source (S331)
 
73 <p><i>Ontario, Canada, Select Marriages</i>. Archives of Ontario, Toronto</p><p><br>A full list of sources can be found <a href="/search/dbextra.aspx?dbid=7921">here</a>.</p> Source (S563)
 
74 <p><i>Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1820-1897. </i> Microfilm Publication M237, 675 rolls. NAI: <a href="http://research.archives.gov/description/6256867" target="_blank">6256867</a>. Records of the U.S. Customs Service, Record Group 36. National Archives at Washington, D.C.</p> <p><i>Passenger and Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1897-1957.</i> Microfilm Publication T715, 8892 rolls. NAI: <a href="http://research.archives.gov/description/300346" target="_blank">300346</a>. Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service; National Archives at Washington, D.C.</p> <p><i>Supplemental Manifests of Alien Passengers and Crew Members Who Arrived on Vessels at New York, New York, Who Were Inspected for Admission, and Related Index, compiled 1887-1952.</i> Microfilm Publication A3461, 21 rolls. NAI: <a href="http://research.archives.gov/description/3887372" target="_blank">3887372.</a> RG 85, Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, 1787-2004; Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service; National Archives, Washington, D.C. </p> <p><i>Index to Alien Crewmen Who Were Discharged or Who Deserted at New York, New York, May 1917-Nov. 1957.</i> Microfilm Publication A3417. NAI: <a href="http://research.archives.gov/description/4497925" target="_blank">4497925.</a> National Archives at Washington, D.C.</p> <p><i>Passenger Lists, 1962-1972, and Crew Lists, 1943-1972, of Vessels Arriving at Oswego, New York.</i> Microfilm Publication A3426. NAI: <a href="http://research.archives.gov/description/4441521" target="_blank">4441521.</a> National Archives at Washington, D.C.</p> Source (S587)
 
75 <p><i>Passenger Lists, 1865–1935</i>. Microfilm Publications T-479 to T-520, T-4689 to T-4874, T-14700 to T-14939, C-4511 to C-4542. Library and Archives Canada, n.d. RG 76-C. Department of Employment and Immigration fonds. Library and Archives Canada Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.</p> Source (S650)
 
76 <p><i>Septennial Census Returns, 1779–1863</i>. Box 1026, microfilm, 14 rolls. Records of the House of Representatives. Records of the General Assembly, Record Group 7. Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, Harrisburg, PA.</p> Source (S499)
 
77 <p><li>Montana State Genealogical Society, comp. <i>Montana Death Index, 1860-2007</i>. Montana State Genealogical Society, Lewis & Clark Library, 120 S Last Chance Gulch, Helena, MT 59620. Copyright 2008.</li></p><p><li>State of Montana, comp. <i>Montana State Death Registry Index, 1907-1953.</i> Montana State Genealogical Society, Montana.</li></p><p><li>State of Montana, comp. <i>Montana Death Index, 1954-2002.</i> State of Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services, Office of Vital Statistics, Helena, Montana.</li></p> Source (S625)
 
78 <p>"Michigan Deaths and Burials, 1800–1995." Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2009, 2010. Index entries derived from digital copies of original and compiled records.</p> Source (S607)
 
79 <p>"Ohio Births and Christenings, 1821-1962." Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2009, 2011. Index entries derived from digital copies of original and compiled records.</p> Source (S660)
 
80 <p>Death Records. Michigan Department of Community Health, Division for Vital Records and Health Statistics, Lansing, Michigan.</p> Source (S538)
 
81 <p>Iowa Department of Public Health. Iowa Marriage Records, 1880–1922. Textual Records. State Historical Society of Iowa, Des Moines, Iowa.</p> <p>Iowa Department of Public Health. Iowa Marriage Records, 1923–37. Microfilm. Record Group 048. State Historical Society of Iowa, Des Moines, Iowa.</p> Source (S536)
 
82 <p>Texas Department of State Health Services. Texas Death Certificates, 1903–1982. iArchives, Orem, Utah.</p> Source (S665)
 
83 <p>United States, Selective Service System. <i>Selective Service Registration Cards, World War II: Fourth Registration</i>. Records of the Selective Service System, Record Group Number 147. National Archives and Records Administration. </p> <p><a href="/search/dbextra.aspx?dbid=1002">Full Source Citation</a>.</p> Source (S597)
 
84 <Table Border=”1”><tr><th>State <th>Citation</th></tr><tr><td></td><td>United States. <I>Federal Mortality Census Schedules, 1850-1880 (formerly in the custody of the Daughters of the American Revolution), and Related Indexes, 1850-1880.</I> T655, 30 rolls. National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D.C. </td><tr><td><b>Alabama</b></td><td>United States. <i>U.S. Census Mortality Schedules, Alabama, 1850-1880</i> Alabama State Department of Archives & History, Montgomery, Alabama</td><tr><td><b>Arkansas</b></td><td>United States. <i>Eighth census of the United States, 1860, Arkansas, mortality</i> and <i>Tenth census of the United States, 1880, Arkansas, mortality</i> [microform] F410.C46 1850a, 1860a, 1870a, 1880a. University of Arkansas Libraries, Fayetteville, Arkansas</td><tr><td><b>California</b></td><td>Nonpopulation Census Schedules for California, 1850-1880. Microfilm, 4 rolls. The Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley.</td></tr><tr><td><b>Colorado</b></td><td>United States. <i>Schedules of the Colorado State Census, 1885. Schedule 5, Mortality.</i> M158, 8 rolls. National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, D.C.</td></tr><tr><td><b>Connecticut</b></td><td>United States. <i>Nonpopulation Federal Census Schedules, Mortality, 1850-1885</i>. 4 rolls. The Connecticut State Library, Hartford, Connecticut.</td></tr><tr><td><b>Florida</b></td><td>United States. <i>Schedules of the Florida State Census of 1885. Schedule 5, Mortality</i>. M845, 13 rolls. National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, D.C.</td></tr><tr><td><b>Illinois</b></td><td>United States. <I> Nonpopulation Census Schedules for Illinois, 1850-1880.</I> T1133, rolls 58-64. National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D.C. </td><tr><td><b>Iowa</b></td><td>United States. <I> Nonpopulation Census Schedules for Iowa, 1850-1880.</I> T1156, rolls 54-62. National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D.C. </td><tr><td><b>Kansas</b></td><td>United States. <I> Non-population Census Schedules for Kansas, 1850-1880.</I> T1130, rolls 1, 3, and 42-44. National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D.C. </td><tr><td><b>Maine</b></td><td>Non-population Census Schedules for Maine, 1850-1880. Microfilm, 4 rolls. Maine State Archives, Augusta.</td></tr><tr><td><b>Massachusetts</b></td><td>United States. <I> Nonpopulation Census Schedules for Massachusetts, 1850-1880.</I> T1204, rolls 9-10, 17, 22-23, and 37-40. National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D.C. </td><tr><td><b>Michigan</b></td><td>United States. <I> Nonpopulation Census Schedules for Michigan, 1850: Mortality Schedules (in the custody of the State Library of Michigan) 1850.</I> T1163, 1 roll. National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D.C. </td><tr><td><b>Michigan</b></td><td>United States. <I> Nonpopulation Census Schedules for Michigan, 1850-1880 (in the custody of the Michigan State Archives), 1850-1880.</I> T1164, rolls 15, 26-27, and 74-77. National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D.C. </td><tr><td><b>Minnesota</b></td><td>United States. <I> Minnesota census schedules for 1870</i>. T132, 13 Rolls. National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, D.C. </td><tr><td><b>Montana</b></td><td>United States. <I> Nonpopulation Census Schedules for Montana, 1870 and 1880.</I> M1806, 1 roll. National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, D.C. </td><tr><td><b>Nebraska</b></td><td>United States. <I> Nonpopulation Census Schedules for Nebraska, 1860-1880.</I> T1128, rolls 2-3 and 14-15. National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D.C.<p>United States. <i>Schedules of the Nebraska State Census of 1885.</i> M352, rolls 1–56. National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D.C. </p></td></td><tr><td><b>New Hampshire</b></td><td>United States. <i>Mortality Schedules, 1850-1880</i>. M # 231.01 – M # 231.13. New Hampshire Archives and Records Management, Concord, New Hampshire.</td><tr><td><b>New Jersey</b></td><td>United States. <I>Nonpopulation Census Schedules for New Jersey, 1850-1880: Mortality.</I> M1810, 4 rolls. National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D.C. </td><tr><td><b>Ohio</b></td><td>United States. <I> Nonpopulation Census Schedules for Ohio, 1850-1880.</I> T1159, rolls 14-15, 29-30, and 102-104. National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D.C. </td><tr><td><b>North Carolina</b></td><td>United States. <I> Nonpopulation Census Schedules for North Carolina, 1850-1880: Mortality and Manufacturing.</I> M1805, rolls 1-5. National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D.C. </td><tr><td><b>Pennsylvania</b></td><td>United States. <I> Non-Population Census Schedules for Pennsylvania, 1850-1880: Mortality.</I> M1838, 11 rolls. National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D.C. </td><tr><td><b>South Carolina</b></td><td>United States. <i>Mortality Schedules, 1850-1880</i>. South Carolina Department of Archives and History, Columbia, South Carolina</td><tr><td><b>Texas</b></td><td>United States. <I> Nonpopulation Census Schedules for Texas, 1850-1880.</I> T1134, rolls 53 and 55-60. National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D.C. </td><tr><td><b>Utah and Vermont</b></td><td>United States. <I> Nonpopulation Census Schedules for Utah Territory and Vermont, 1870: Mortality.</I> M1807, 1 roll. National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, D.C. </td><tr><td><b>Virginia</b></td><td>United States. <I> Nonpopulation Census Schedules for Virginia, 1850-1880.</I> T1132, rolls 1, 10, and 18-19. National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D.C. </td><tr><td><b>Virginia</b></td><td>United States. <I> Eighth Census of the United States for the Northern District of Halifax County, Virginia, 1860: Schedules of Free Inhabitants, Slave Inhabitants, Mortality, Agriculture, Industry, and Social Statistics, 1860.</I> M1808, 1 roll. National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, D.C. </td><tr><td><b>Washington</b></td><td>United States. <I> Non-population Census Schedules for Washington Territory, 1860-1880.</I> A1154, roll 3. National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, D.C. </td><tr><td><b>Wisconsin</b></td><td>United States. <i>United States Census Schedules for Wisconsin</i>. Series 1675-1677, 4 rolls. Wisconsin Historical Society, Madison, Wisconsin.</td></table>. Source (S593)
 
85 <ul><li><i>Census of 1851 (Canada East, Canada West, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia)</i>. Library and Archives Canada, Ottawa, Canada.</li><li><i>Census of Nova Scotia, 1851</i>. Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada: Nova Scotia Archives and Records Management (NSARM): Nova Scotia Board of Statistics, 1851.</li></ul><p>NS Archives and Records Management gives no warranty as to the accuracy, completeness or fitness for the purpose of the information provided. Images may be used only for purposes of research, private study or education. Infringement of this condition may result in legal action.</p><br><p>Images are reproduced with the permission of Library and Archives Canada.</p> Source (S577)
 
86 <ul><li>1870 U.S. census, population schedules. NARA microfilm publication M593, 1,761 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.</li><li>Minnesota census schedules for 1870. NARA microfilm publication T132, 13 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.</li></ul> Source (S558)
 
87 <ul><li>Archives of Ontario. <i>Registrations of Deaths, 1869-1938.</i> MS 935, reels 1-615. Archives of Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.</li><li>Archives of Ontario. <i>Registrations of Ontario Overseas Deaths, 1939-1947.</i> MS 944, reels 1-11. Archives of Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.</li><li>Archives of Ontario. <i>Division Registrar Vital Statistics Records, 1858-1930.</i> MS 940, reels 5-10, 16, 21, 26-27. Archives of Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.</li></ul> Source (S630)
 
88 'Anna Hayden Married Israel Osborn of East Windsor' Family F1929
 
89 (begin page 11)
On this eighteenth day of August one thousand eight (hundred) and thirty two personally appeared before me John Mops a Judge of Washington County Courts, Norman Phelps a resident of the town of Fort Ann in the county of Washington and state of New York aged sixty nine years the ninth day of November last past who being duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7, 1832:

That I entered the service of the United States under the following named officers and served as herein stated. That in the latter part of August in the year of 1777 resided in the town of Hebron, County of Hartford in the State of Connecticut. And at that time and year I volunteered into the service of the United States as a Musician in the militia of Connecticut entered the service under the command of Capt. John Skinner and Col Latimer commanded this regiment. Jack Jones was the Lieut Col and we marched to Stillwater and joined Gen Poor’s Brigade and were stationed on Bemis Heights where we remained for two (or) three weeks at which time Gen Burgoyne (The English commander) with his army was advancing and on the fourteenth of Sept he encamped on the heights of Saratoga. The Indians and Tories were committing their deprecation and there were small skirmishes at our out parts and on the night of the seventeenth Burgoyne encamped within a few miles and the next day we were employed in repairing bridges between the two camps and preparations were making for battle and on the nineteenth of Sept about two o’clock we were informed the enemy was approaching on our left where the battle commenced and then there was a general battle which continued until dark when we retired to our camp. I was informed the enemy lay on their arms all night. This battle was very severe. A great many killed and wounded. Neither party obtained the victory, although both claimed it. The next day Burgoyne retired a short distance. Both armies retained their distance position until the seventh day of October when there was another general battle that night and darkness put an end to the action. We lay all night with our arms in our hand ready to receive the assault the (end page 11)

(begin page 12)
next day but in the cover of the night Burgoyne drew off his whole army to his strong camp on the river heights and on the eighth day of October at night he retreated to Saratoga. There came on a heavy rain. We pursued them and buried their dead. Gen Frazer (An English general) was wounded and died. Our forces had increased so much that Burgoyne was wholly surrounded. He did not retreat further than the falls north of Fish Creek and on the sixteenth of October he surrendered. We then marched to Albany where we encamped until I was discharged. I served at this time and did my duty as a Musician two months and returned home to Hebron aforesaid where I resided until in the month of June in the year of 1778 when I enlisted in the Connecticut State Troops under the command (of) Capt Lathran & Lieut Elijah Buck for six months. We marched to Groveton east of New London where we joined Col Lidgard regiment where we were stationed and was employed in building Fort Griswold and were engaged during the whole time of my enlistment before we had completed it which was in November when I was discharged. I served and did my duty as a private soldier six months and returned to Hebron aforesaid where I resided until the first of June in the year of 1780 when I enlisted in the Connecticut State Troops or new ( ) to fill up the continental line and went into the service for six months under the command of the Capt named Teannot Wolcut, Lieut Grovener we marched to Clarks Town near Topon Bay on the north river where we joined Col Hezekiel Holdridge’s regiment and Brig Gen Kunton’s brigade. We were stationed and encamped in Clarks Town. In the ( ) Gen George Washington came to review the troops in company with two Indian chiefs. At one time we were commanded by order of General Washington after we had been there about four months to move our encampment for the health of the troops. When went to Florvy Straw about four miles and encamped. During this time Major Arnold was hung for (being) a spy and Gen Green took his department and marched to the southward to meet Cornwallis. By the order of the commander in chief we remained here until the first of Dec when my time expired and I received a written discharge signed by Col Hezekial Holdridge which I gave on my return to my father. I do not know where it (is) nor what has become of it. I served and did my duty as a private soldier six months & returned (end of page 12)

(begin page 13)
to Hebron aforesaid and on the first of April in the year 1781 I enlisted in the Connecticut State Troops for one year as a Musician. ( ) Lieut Root was the muster master. After I enlisted we were employed in drilling and in testing soldiers about two months and then we marched to Middlesex Hill where we was met by the enemy and a small skirmish ensued between us. We retreated. Had three men killed. We then marched to Stanford and Horse Neck where we joined our Capt Moulton and ensign Cutter which was the company I belonged to. We were there also attached to Brig Gen Sholerteury’s brigade where we were stationed as a guard to the ( ) ( ). We built barracks for winter quarters on the back of Talmer’s Hill where we encamped for winter. And sometimes in the winter the refugees commanded by Gen Dilingser came in sight of us to take our garrison. Capt Niland went out with a party and met them. He killed several and drove the rest away. We had several skirmishes with them during the winter and the first of April in the year of 1782 Gen Sholerteury marched us into Sanford Town where we were discharged. I served and did my duty as a Musician one year and returned home to the town of Hebron aforesaid where I resided until after the revolutionary war. And then moved to Moretown where I resided two years. I then moved to the town of Cambridge where I lived one year. From there I moved into Kingsbury and lived (there) three years. I moved from there into the town of Fort Ann where I now live and have lived ever since.
That I have no documentary evidence and that I know of no person whose testimony I can provide who can testify to my service except Jonathon Horton and John Powers whose affidavits are hereunto annexed. That I was born in the town of Hebron, County of Hartford in the year of 1763 and State of Connecticut. That I have received no discharge in writing except the one which is already accounted for. That there is no clergyman living in the neighborhood where I reside. That in the town book in Hebron aforesaid there is a record of my age. And that I cannot attend the court from my bodily infirmities that Nathanial Pitcher and Reuben C Gibson are persons who I am known in my present neighborhood who can testify as to my character for veracity and their belief of my living as a soldier of the revolution.(end page 13)

(Begin page 14)
I hereby relinquish every claim whatever to a pension of annuity except the present and ( ). That my name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any state.

Signed Norman Phelps
Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid before me John Mafs.

Nathaniel Pitcher and Reuben C Gibson residing in the town of Kingsbury hereby certify that we are well acquainted with Norman Phelps who has subscribed and sworn to the above declaration that we believe him to be sixty nine years of age that he is respected and believed in the neighborhood where he resides to have been a soldier of the revolution and we concur in that opinion.
Signed Nathaniel Pitcher and Reuben C Gibson
Sworn and subscribed the day and year aforesaid before me John Mops.

And I the said Judge do hereby declare my opinion after the investigation of the matters and after getting the interrogatories subscribed by the war department that the above named applicant was a revolutionary soldier and served as he stated and I the said Judge further certifies that it appears to me that Nathanial Pitcher and Reuben C Gibson who has signed the preceding certificate are entitled to credit.

I further certify that the applicant Norman Phelps cannot from bodily infirmity attend the court.
State of New York, Washington County. Signed John Mops

I, John L Leigh Clerk of the said county do certify that John Mops before whom the preceding declaration, certificates and affidavits purports to have been sworn was at the date of the ( ) one of the judges of Washington County Courts of Common Pleas in and for said County and also (end page 14)

(begin page 16)
State of New York Washington County personally appeared this 17th day of August in the year of the lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty two, before me Joshua Pelton, one of the justices of the peace and for the town of Hartford, County of aforesaid, Jonathon Horton a person well known to me and of undoubted truth and veracity and deposeth and saith that he is acquainted with Norman Phelps and knows that he was in the state service of the State of Connecticut and that he served as Musician under the command of General Poor in the Company of Captain John Skinner at Bemas’s Heights in the State of New York in the revolutionary war at the taking of General Burgoyne in the year 1777 a little over two months at that time and this deponent being in the service at the same time and further this deponent saith not.
Signed Jonathon Horton
Subscribed and sworn before me this 17th day of August 1832
Joshua Pelton Justice of the Peace. (end page 16)

(begin page 17)
State of New York Warren County
Personally appeared this 14th day of August in the year one thousand eight hundred and thirty two, before Hobby Mead one of the judges of the court of Common Pleas in and for said County John Powers a person to me well known deposeth and saith that Norman Phelps was in the service of the State of Connecticut and served as a drummer under the command of General Mabrberry, Capt Moulton at Stanford and Horsneck in the revolutionary war to guard the ( ) for one year this deponent being in the service at the same time and thinks they served about a year, and in the year 1781, and further this deponent saith not.
Signed John Power
Subscribed and sworn this 14th day of August 1832 before me.
Signed Hobby Mead. (end page 17)

(begin page 18)
State of New York Warren County, John Powers being duly sworn according to law deposeth and saith that he was well acquainted with Norman Phelps as a revolutionary soldier whose declaration in order to attain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832 is hereunto annexed.
This deponent further saith that Norman Phelps enlisted in Connecticut State Troops in the month of April in the year of 1781 for one year as a Musician and went into the service under the command of Capt Moulton and was attached to the Waterberry brigade.
And this deponent further saith he was in the United States service at the same time and that Norman Phelps did his duty as a Musician in the service during the whole term of his enlistment and was discharged in April in the year of 1782 and this deponent further saith not.
Signed John Powers
Certify the above oath or affidavit was taken before me in due form of law on this 19th day of Sept 1832 and that the said John Powers is a man of truth & veracity
Signed Ira A Paddock ( )
Court of Common Pleas
(end page 18)
 
Phelps, Norman (I624)
 
90 (I) John Trumbull, a cooper, came from Newcastle-on-Tyne to New England, and settled in Rowley, Massachusetts, in 1640. He was in Roxbury as early as 1639, and was a member of the Apostle John Eliot's church. He shortly removed, however, to Rowley, and his homestead was in the heart of that village, fronting on the common. He taught the first school in the town, was a freeman, May 13, 1640, selectman in 1650 and 1652, town clerk 1654 to 1656, and died in 1657. He was buried May 18 of that year. He married in England, in 1635, Eleanor Chandler, and brought his wife and a son John with him. Her name appears in the New England records as Ellen. She died about 1648-49, and he married (second) in August, 1650, Ann, widow of Michael Hopkinson, of Rowley. She survived him and married (third) March i, 1658, Richard Swan, as his second wife. She died in Rowley, and was buried April 5, 1678..

Children of first wife : John.

Ha nnah, born December 14, 1640 Judah, April 3, 1643 Ruth, February 23, 1645 Joseph...

Children of second marriage.

Abigail, born October 13, 1651 Mary, April 7, 1654.

From: New England Families, Genealogical and Memorial; a Record of the Achievements of Her People in the Founding of a Nation, Vol 5. by The American Historical Society
 
Trumbull, John (I5850)
 
91 (Online database: AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2002), Source (S435)
 
92 -Reformed Faith. foresterer from Pfalz, Alsbach place, arrived in Oranienbaum (not far from Saint Petersburg) on 8/8/1766 by the ship underthe command of Selender. They arrived in Kukkus Colony on 26 June 1767

1766 Kuhlberg List #3434
Unknown Luebeck ship, skipper Johann Gottfried Seelender 8 Aug 1766
Conrad Reitz
Ref, farmer from Pfalz.
Wife: Maria
Children: Johann 14, Catharina 9, Elisabeth 5

1767 Kukkus First Settler List #25
Konrad Reitz
Age 54, ref, forester from Alsbach, Kurpfalz
Wife: Maria Elisabeth 36
Son: Johannes 13

Apparently the two younger children did not survive the trip to Kukkus.
 
Reitz, Konrad (I1973)
 
93 .
 
Phelps, Norman Jr (I623)
 
94 1/1/2009 per Gayle Zimmerman, she is not convinced that Amanda and her sister Eve are two separate people. Also as Norman died in 1846 Amanda and/or Eve are probably the child(ren) of Liberty Irish, who Judith was having an affair with. See divorce records under media.
 
Irish, Eve (I6893)
 
95 10/26/1824 Norbury, Heath (I7183)
 
96 10/4/1886 Alfred Ralston/Mary Irish prev marr: 0/0 Res: Fairgrove/Fairgrove age: 22/18 Born: PA/MI farmer Alex Raynick Justice of the Peace Witnesses: Lanson Wilcox/Edward Vincent both of Caro DOR 12/6/1886
 
Family F193
 
97 11 days after, died Bissell, Ephraim (I5949)
 
98 11/12 is age on 1910 census in may 1910 Gordon, Capitola E (I203)
 
99 12th Governor of Georgia--Signer of the Declaration of Independence

LYMAN HALL was born on April 12, 1724 in Wallingford, Connecticut. It was not in the state of his birth, however, that Hall would gain fame as a colonial congressman, but further south, in Georgia.
Hall studied for the ministry at Yale where he graduated in 1747 at the age of twenty-three. Soon after, he married Abigail Burr and subsequently decided he would rather heal unhealthy bodies than tainted souls. So he studied long and hard and by 1754 he was ready to practice medicine.
First he opened an office in South Carolina, then he and his family settled in Sunbury on the Georgia coast. As a dedicated doctor, Hall's practice expanded and prospered - so much so that he was financially able to acquire a vast and successful rice plantation in Burke County, Georgia.
While the Georgia legislature was at first reluctant to send a representative to the Second Continental congress in 1775, Lyman Hall was determined to change this posture. He called a citizen's meeting that was filled with patriots who outwardly supported his loud cry for total independence. Thus, he was elected as a delegate to congress. He had no authority to vote, however, until the following year when his appointment was confirmed by the Georgia legislature.
In 1776, two other representatives for Georgia joined Hall at the Old State House in Philadelphia. He was the oldest of these signers and the one who spoke out most forcefully for freedom and a breakaway from the rule of England.
During the Revolutionary War, while Hall was still serving in Congress, the British destroyed his beautiful plantation. Hall's family, however, managed to escape to the north, later joining him in Philadelphia.
In 1782, LymanHall retuned to Georgia, where he was elected to the office of governor. He served just one year before returning in 1784 to a new plantation.
Hall died on October 19, 1790 in Burke County, Georgia, at the age of sixty-six.

Lyman Hall
1724-1790
Representing Georgia at the Continental Congress
Born: April 12, 1724
Birthplace: Wallingford, Conn.
Education: Graduated Yale College, (Physician.)
Work: Elected to Continental Congress, 1775; Delegate to the Georgia House of Assembly, Elected Governor of Georgia, 1783; Judge, 1785.
Died: October 19, 1790
Lyman Hall was born in Connecticut in 1724. He studied medicine at Yale College, graduated in 1756 and went to Charleston, South Carolina, shortly after to establish a medical practice. He bought land in Georgia in 1760 and established a plantation there, while continuing to practice medicine. Two years later he returned to South Carolina, still as a physician. In 1774, by this time partisan in revolutionary politics, he again came to Georgia and earned the unflattering attention of the Royal Governor, James Wright. He also secured election to the Continental Congress, where he was involved in provisioning food and medicine for the Revolutionary Armies. He was reelected to congress through 1780 but retired to his adopted state in 1777 when state matters, including the situation of his longtime friend Button Gwinnett, demanded his attention. A short time later, the war reached Savannah. Hall's property was burned and he stood accused of high treason. He fled to Charleston, which was also overtaken by the British. He then fled to Connecticut, some say, where he was harbored by family.
He returned to Georgia in 1782, to reclaim his lands, was elected to the House of Assembly in 1783 and then elevated to the office of the Governor. After a single year as Governor, he served one more year in the Assembly, then a year as judge. He then returned to private life and was involved in the continued development of agriculture in the state. Hall died in 1790 at the age of 66.
 
Hall, Lyman (I1689)
 
100 1601 Wilson St Seeley, Herbert Henry (I798)
 
101 17 May 1897 the family moved to the village Rozhdestvenskaje, the Akmalir Region (the Middle Asia) Reitz, Johannes (I2029)
 
102 17 year old Emily Shultz died 1 Jan 1865. She left behind 2 month old Albert Smith. Probate records show that Gearhart and Nancy Kile filed for guardianship over Albert Smith. When Albert reached adulthood he legally changed his name to Albert Kile. It is our belief that Nancy Kile, whose maiden name is Nancy Shultz (the daughter of Samuel Shultz and Mary Norberry of Columbia County, Pennsylvania) was an Aunt to Albert.

An interesting entry in a Tuscola County History book shows Mary, Sally, Albert and Emily Schultz as being in the first school class in Tuscola in 1853. See below:

http://www.interment.net/data/us/mi/tuscola/watrous/index.htm

http://www.usgennet.org/usa/mi/county/tuscola/hist/junfir.htmTaken from The History of Tuscola County, Biographical Sketches and Illustrations, H. R. Page Co., Chicago, 1883. Thanks to Bonnie Petee.
The first school in the town of Juniata was taught in the summer of 1853 by Miss Ellen E. Miller, now wife of Charles R. Seldon of Caro. The building used was a low log shanty, built by D. G. Wilder to live in, until he could construct a better habitation. It stood nealy opposite the present site of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in Watrousville. The following are the names of pupils who attended this first term of school: Sarah, Arvilla, and Eliza McGlone, George, Charles and Abraham Pettingill, Nancy, John and Dall Streeter, Jennie and James King, George Smith, Mary, Sally, Albert and Emily Schultz, Martha Huntley, Lemuel Gamble, Jonathan, Clarissa and Salmon Simons, Nelson and Dana Miller, and Anna Morrell.
 
Shultz, Emily (I809)
 
103 1726 Aug 18, Andrew Hutchinson received his land grant of 1119 acres and 40 perches in Stafford Co., VA, (now Fairfax Co., VA), from the Rt. Hon. Thomas, 6th Lord Fairfax, who was proprietary agent for King George III of England at the time. Andrew was a Justice of the Peace from 1745 to 1757, a tobacco farmer, tobacco inspector and a surveyor. In 1744 he was appointed a Vestryman of Truro Parish. His records as Vestryman can be found in Pohick, the central church for the Parish. While serving in that position, he deeded land for the building of Rocky Run Church. They couldn’t find water on this land so it was deeded back to him and the church was built on land belonging to his neighbor, Willouby Newton, another prominent landholder in the Centreville area. During the 1740’s and ‘50’s, Andrew Hutchinson bought an additional 1000 acres of land in Loudoun and Fairfax Counties which he deeded to his sons, Joseph and Benjamin. Before his death in 1760, Andrew Hutchinson divided his original land grant of 1119 acres and 40 perches among his other 3 sons, John Hutchinson, Daniel Hutchinson and Jeremiah Hutchinson. The John Hutchison House at Pleasant Valley, VA, sits on the portion deeded to John. Jeremiah Hutchinson’s portion is now part of the Pleasant Valley Estates subdivision. The last family to live in Jeremiah Hutchinson’s house was Andrew’s great-grandson, Joshua Hutchison and his family. Joshua died in 1931. Both of these houses have been restored. He documents his and Jane's children in Bible Records, carrying the date of MDCCXXXVIII, (1738) and published by the Oxford Company, John Baskett. Family legend states that Andrew and Jane gave each of their children a bible in which the names and birth dates of their children were written. Andrew’s personal bible, printed in 1591, was last known to have been in the possession of Rev. Melvin Lee Steadman of Purcellville, VA. He was a Methodist minister, genealogist, historian and author. He also collected old Bibles. He told Wanda Kirpatrick that Mrs. Harry Padgett of Pleasant Valley, VA, gave Andrew’s Bible to him. She was the g-g-granddaughter of Andrew’s son, Jeremiah.

from message boad post:
Within days of Richard Omohundros (Jos. Pinson's father in law) penning his will in 1745 Fairfax Co,Peter Turner's estate was appraised in the same county.The appraisers were Thomas Pinson and Andrew Hutchinson (Hutcheson).Hutchinson was Richard Omohundro's brother in law.They had both married daughters of Thomas Browing of Westmoreland Co. Va.

citing Prince William County Northern Neck Warrants and Surveys
Thomas Pincent, Junr. 14 Sept. 1739-12 Nov. 1739; 218 a. on s. side Elk Licking Run aganst the fork of Cub Run: adj. Mr. Richd Brett, decd., Mr. Landon Carter, Col Geo Eskridge dec’d.C.C. John Hutcheson & Joseph Pincent.Surv. James Thomas, Junr.

John Hutcheson was undoubtedly the son of Andrew Hutcheson above, and therefore first cousin of Joseph Pinson's wife Mary.I'll follow with a brief history of the Prince William/Fairfax Hutchesons later, but for now accept this point.

When you were appraising land for purchase (or lease), you would choose someone close to you as chain carrier.It was a serious project and you wanted to enlist someone with your interest at heart.Obviously, Joseph "Pincent" (sic) and Thomas "Pincent" (sic) were related, and Joseph would have been a good choice.

While we can prove the point separately, having John Hutcheson as chain carrier makes it plain the variant spelling of Pinson as Pincent was just that.It also indicates the Joseph Pinson who married Mary Omohundro, was the same Joseph Pinson carrying the chains in the above survey.Whether this was the same Thomas Pinson, or a relative (son?) of the one who appraised the Turner estate with Andrew Hutcheson, he would have known the Hutcheson family and would have accepted Joseph Pinson's wife's cousin as a chain carrier.

Research done by Hutcheson (Hutchinson) genealogists indicate Andrew Hutchinson was born either in England or Westmoreland Co. Va. in March 1787. His father died when he was just a child, apparently leaving him as his only heir. Hutcheson married Jane Browning, daugher of Thomas Browning and sister of Richard Omohundros first wife Mary Browning.

Andrew Hutchinson (Hutcheson) inherited large tracts of land from both his mother and his father in law.One of the two plantations inherited from his father in law according to Browning’s will, (Will Bk 8-1, p. 210), dated 31 Jan 1726, prov. 22 Feb 1726, was “ye plantation whereon ye sd. Andrew Hutchison now lives.” This plantation is believed to have been on or near Rocky Run in the area of Centreville, VA.That would place it right by his brother in law, Richard Omohundro's residence and also very close to the Pinson mill site.

Hutchinson later added to his holding with other purchases in Prince William/Fairfax Co.and surrounding counties.Extensive documentation exists through wills and family bibles that prove the names of his wife, children and that he had no natural siblings (only half siblings named Reynolds or Runnells).

Hutcheson was a wealthy tobacco grower and prominent member of Virginia society.He was a Justice of the Peace from 1745 to 1757, became a vestryman for Truro Parish (Prince William Co.) and also acted as a surveyor. while a vestryman, While serving as a vestryman, he deeded land for the building of Rocky Run Church, but the land proved unsuitable, and the church was built on land belonging to his neighbor, Willouby Newton.This would be the same Willouby Newton that sublet land to his brother in law, Richard Omohundro.I believe it to be the same Newton who recommended William Grove (see prior post) as the church clerk.

Hutchinson is named in numerous road surveys and construction projects.Also named many times in those records is Mary Omohundro Pinson's stepbrother, Jacob Remey.On one occasion, Hutcheson was appointed to hire workers to build a bridge across Cub Run and 4 months later Remey was paid for the job.Looking above you see that Thomas Pinson Jr's land was on Cub Run.

Andrew Hutcheson was an only child and migrated to Prince William County.To my knowledge there is no evidence of another Andrew Hutcheson living in the area at the time.He is known to have had a son named John supposedly born March 08, 1711/12.The Andrew and John Hutcheson (Hutchinson) shown above in association with the Pinsons are undoubtedly the uncle and cousin of Mary Omohundro Pinson. 
Hutchison, Andrew (I6481)
 
104 1766 Kuhlberg List #3384
Unknown Luebeck ship, skipper Johann Gottfried Seelender 8 Aug 1766
Gottfried Maser
Ref, farmer from Pfalz
Wife: Anna
Pleve's Maser Surname Chart lists wife as Anna Eva

1767 Kukkus First Settler List #24
Gottfried Maser
Age 26, ref, farmer from Loehnfeld?, Kurpfalz
Wife: Eva 25
Son: Konrad 1

It would appear that Konrad was born after arriving in Russia

Stumpp has Gottfried Maser from Ortzberg(Ortenberg)/Stockheim/Buedingen

From the AHSGR website: Maser: said by the Kukkus FSL to be from Loehnfeld(?), Kurpfalz. Eleanor Sissell (2010) has proven the place is Lengfeld, which in modern times is in Hessen. She has the Maser family, prior to their coming to Lengfeld in church records of Switzerland. The children born in Kurpfalz were spelled Maaser while the FSL spells it Maser.

Also from the AHSGR website:Loehnfeld(?), Kurpfalz: Alton Sissell (2005) using an LDS film and a visit to the village, proved this is Lengfeld. It is said by the Kukkus FSL to be home to Hoefner, Maser, Schaefer, and maybe Houg? families. Alton Sissell (2005) in the same fashion as the earlier sentence proved this to be the place which the Maser/Maaser family left to go to Russia.

-Reformed Faith, farmer from kurpfalz, Lenfel Village, arrived in Kukkus Colony on 26 Jul 1767. They arrived in Oranienbaum )not far from Saint Petersburg) on 8 Aug 1766 by the ship "Selender"

From the AHSGR website: Maser: said by the Kukkus FSL to be from Loehnfeld(?), Kurpfalz. Eleanor Sissell (2010) has proven the place is Lengfeld, which in modern times is in Hessen. She has the Maser family, prior to their coming to Lengfeld in church records of Switzerland. The children born in Kurpfalz were spelled Maaser while the FSL spells it Maser.

Also from the AHSGR website:Loehnfeld(?), Kurpfalz: Alton Sissell (2005) using an LDS film and a visit to the village, proved this is Lengfeld. It is said by the Kukkus FSL to be home to Hoefner, Maser, Schaefer, and maybe Houg? families. Alton Sissell (2005) in the same fashion as the earlier sentence proved this to be the place which the Maser/Maaser family left to go to Russia. 
Maser, Gottfried (I1976)
 
105 1766 Kuhlberg List #3507
The Luebeck Ship, Skipper Wiebe Heinrichson 8 Aug 1766
George Heinrich
Ref, farmer from Braunfels
Wife: Anna
Children: Georg 10, Johann 4

1766-1767 Transport List #498
Joseph Georg Heinrich, ref
Wife: Anna Elisabeth
Son: Georg Wilhelm 10 ¼ died enroute

1767 Kukkus First Settler List #39
Johann Georg Heinrich
Age 39, ref, weaver of floor carpets from Werdorf , Braunfels
Wife: Anna Elisabeth 39

Son Johann does not appear in the transport list, he may have died in Oranienbaum, whereas Georg Wilhelm died in transport.

Name Johann Georg Heinrich, from Wehrdorf, Braunfels appears in Solms-Braunfels Archives asking to be allowed to leave for Volga Russia in 1766.

Werdorf churchbook shows Johann Georg Henrich born 31 Jan 1729 to Hans Kaspar Henrich and Anna Christina Zimmerman. It also shows his marriage Anna Elisabeth Rupp born 12 Mar 1729 to Johann Philip Rupp and Anna Elisabeth Dietz.

From AHSGR German Origins Project Web SIte: Werdorf, [Solms-]Braunfels [Principality] is some 5 miles N of Braunfels city, and said by the Kukkus FSL to be home to a Heinrich family. Confirmed, with information provided by Eric Hahn who was hired by Joan Knizek, taken from Werdorf Reformed Lutheran Church records and from Solms-Branunfels Castle civil records in Braunfels, as home to both this Heinrich and his Rupp wife, in Werdorf Reformed Lutheran Church records and in Solms-Branunfels Castle civil records in Braunfels..........Joan has birth dates and parents for this couple as well as birthdates for their children; prior to leaving Germany the family name was normally spelled Henrichs.

1766 Kuhlberg List #3507
The Luebeck Ship, Skipper Wiebe Heinrichson 8 Aug 1766
George Heinrich
Ref, farmer from Braunfels
Wife: Anna
Children: Georg 10, Johann 4

1766-1767 Transport List #498
Joseph Georg Heinrich, ref
Wife: Anna Elisabeth
Son: Georg Wilhelm 10 ¼ died enroute

1767 Kukkus First Settler List #39
Johann Georg Heinrich
Age 39, ref, weaver of floor carpets from Werdorf , Braunfels
Wife: Anna Elisabeth 39

Son Johann does not appear in the transport list, he may have died in Oranienbaum, whereas Georg Wilhelm died in transport.

Name Johann Georg Heinrich, from Wehrdorf, Braunfels appears in Solms-Braunfels Archives asking to be allowed to leave for Volga Russia in 1766.

Werdorf churchbook shows Johann Georg Henrich born 31 Jan 1729 to Hans Kaspar Henrich and Anna Christina Zimmerman. It also shows Anna Elisabeth Rupp born 12 Mar 1729 to Johann Philip Rupp and Anna Elisabeth Dietz. However the entries seem to run out in 1732 and there is no marriage or children information for either to tie these two records together.

From AHSGR German Origins Project Web SIte: Werdorf, [Solms-]Braunfels [Principality] is some 5 miles N of Braunfels city, and said by the Kukkus FSL to be home to a Heinrich family. Confirmed, with information provided by Eric Hahn who was hired by Joan Knizek, taken from Werdorf Reformed Lutheran Church records and from Solms-Branunfels Castle civil records in Braunfels, as home to both this Heinrich and his Rupp wife, in Werdorf Reformed Lutheran Church records and in Solms-Branunfels Castle civil records in Braunfels..........Joan has birth dates and parents for this couple as well as birthdates for their children; prior to leaving Germany the family name was normally spelled Henrichs.
 
Heinrich, Johann Georg (I2093)
 
106 1766 Kuhlberg List #3582
The Luebeck Ship, Skipper Wiebe Heinrichson 8 Aug 1766
Abraham Kukkus
Ref, farmer from Pfalz
Wife: Anna
Children: Johann 14, Philipp 6, Agnessa 11

1767 Kukkus First Settler List #1
Abraham Kukkus
Age 42, ref, farmer from Alsbach , Kurpfalz
Wife: Anna Maria 42
Children: Johann Philipp 7, Agnessa 12

Apparently Johann 14 did not survive the transport to Kukkus.
 
Kukkus, Abraham (I3628)
 
107 1766 Kuhlberg List #3598
The Luebeck Ship, Skipper Wiebe Heinrichson 8 Aug 1766
Adam Baum
Cath, farmer from Mainz.
Widower
Children: Heinrich 14, Maria 16, Anna 10 ½

Children of Adam Baum
1767 Kukkus First Settler List #50a
Heinrich Baum
Age 17, cath, from Zeiskam, Kurmainz
Sister: Anna Maria 12
Orphans living in the household of Wilhelm Kloss

Maria 16 either did not survive transport or married.
 
Baum, Heinrich (I2099)
 
108 1766 Kuhlberg List-probably not a match #1735
Johann Hergenroeder
Ref, farmer from Isenburg
Wife: Anna

Also: --probably not a match #3577
Johann Heizenroeder
Ref, farmer from Isenburg
single

1767 Kukkus First Settler List #19
Johann Hergenroder
Age 25, ref, Barrel Maker from Raubach, Isenburg
Wife: Pilippina 18

These are both weak connections.
 
Hergenroeder, Johannes (I3604)
 
109 1766 Kuhlburg List #1744
Christoph Heitzenraeder. ref. farmer from Isenburg
Wife: Maria
C: Johann 2

1767 Balzer First Settler List #75
Christoph Heizenroeder, 30, ref, farmer from Isenburg
Wife: Anna Margaretha, 33
C: Johann Thomas, 4
1798 Census notes she is from Balzer 
Unknown, Anna Margareta (I3571)
 
110 1775 Census Revision for Schilling states Konrad Bell, Bachelor, age 25 "farms with the aid of relatives" The 1775 revision list for Schilling furthur notes that Konrad Bell, along with 2 other bachelors "Assigned to the colonies as laborers. According to testimony of the community they came alone to Russian and did not receive loans for farming. They were living in Lesnoy Karamysh (Grimm) with Grimm. They were in the colony of Gololobovka (Doenhof) and kinder (?) in that colony. They are currently engaged in farming, and with time will marry. Upon entering the economy they hope to be able to pay their debts. They are currently unable to assume the responsibility."
 
Bell, Konrad (I5120)
 
111 1775 Schilling census revision- HH53-Jost Geisner age 27 wife Elizabeta Dorotea age 15 1/2, wife's sisters Anna Margareta age 10. Anna Margareta age 6.5, Sophia age 1

1798 Schilling census revision-HH 23- Just Burkhard Geisner (Heisner?) age 50 wife Maria Elizabeta Volk from Beideck age 43. Children from deceased wife Johann Friedrich age 16, Johann Georg age 14, Johann Heinrich age 4, daughter Anna Elizabeta age 9

Unable to locate Jost Geisner on the Kuhlberg list, a transport list or a first settler list.
1775 Schilling census revision- HH53-Jost Geisner age 27 wife Elizabeta Dorotea age 15 1/2, wife's sisters Anna Margareta age 10. Anna Margareta age 6.5, Sophia age 1

1798 Schilling census revision-HH 23- Just Burkhard Geisner (Heisner?) age 50 wife Maria Elizabeta Volk from Beideck age 43. Children from deceased wife Johann Friedrich age 16, Johann Georg age 14, Johann Heinrich age 4, daughter Anna Elizabeta age 9

Unable to locate Jost Geisner on the Kuhlberg list, a transport list or the first settler list.
 
Geisner, Jost Burghardt (I5121)
 
112 1798 census notes she is from Anton Paul, Maria Barbara (I5758)
 
113 1798 Census notes she is from Kutter Haas, Anna Margaretha (I5622)
 
114 1798 Census notes that he is from Balzer. He is probably the son of Matthias Kisselmann who is the only Kisselmann family on the 1767 Balzer Census. Kisselman, Johann Martin (I2879)
 
115 1798 census says he is the son of Johannes Feleing, deceased. Felsing, Johann Georg (I2444)
 
116 1798 Schilling Census notes that she is from Beideck. Volk, Maria Elizabeta (I5740)
 
117 1798 Schilling census revision movement chart- #38 Maiden Margaretha, daughter of Just Geisner, married Konrad Dell 1797 in Volskaya (Kukkus) . Geisner, Margaretha (I5122)
 
118 18 year gap between children. Perhaps she is a grandchild. Gibbons, Amelia (I7147)
 
119 1810 provides a very confusing picture. We have 3 people named Norman Phelps in Washington County. Two of them are in Queensbury, living side by side, and one is labeled Junior, so it would be easy to assume those are the correct two. But, they are not in Fort Ann and the other one is in Fort Ann. Could Norman have moved and been counted twice? On the family.phelpsinc web site, some of his children are born in Queensbury and some in Fort Ann. The Queensbury Births are in 1795 and 1805, with 1800 and 1802 being in Fort Ann. That suggests repeated moves back and forth. Or perhaps there really are two of them, and their family records are confusingly intertwined with each other. So let’s look at both beginning with the Fort Ann entry.

Males: 0-10 = 2 (Samuel age 8 and Benjamin age 1)
10-15 = 3 (John 10, Alpheus 15) We have one extra child. But perhaps Amasa age 20 is counted in the wrong column.
26-44 = 1 (this would be Norman, but he is 47)
Females:
0-10 = 1 (Mary age 5)
26-44 =1 (this would be his wife Sarah, but she is 45. I would say close enough on this.)

Now let’s looks at the Queensbury entry. Remember this one is right after the Norman Phelps, Junior entry (whose age and wife’s age are correct, no children yet) so we would presume it would be the correct entry.
 
Phelps, Norman (I624)
 
120 1810 provides a very confusing picture. We have 3 people named Norman Phelps in Washington County. Two of them are in Queensbury, living side by side, and one is labeled Junior, so it would be easy to assume those are the correct two. But, they are not in Fort Ann and the other one is in Fort Ann. Could Norman have moved and been counted twice? On the family.phelpsinc web site, some of his children are born in Queensbury and some in Fort Ann. The Queensbury Births are in 1795 and 1805, with 1800 and 1802 being in Fort Ann. That suggests repeated moves back and forth. Or perhaps there really are two of them, and their family records are confusingly intertwined with each other. So let’s look at both beginning with the Fort Ann entry.

Males: 0-10 = 2 (Samuel age 8 and Benjamin age 1)
10-15 = 3 (John 10, Alpheus 15) We have one extra child. But perhaps Amasa age 20 is counted in the wrong column.
26-44 = 1 (this would be Norman, but he is 47)
Females:
0-10 = 1 (Mary age 5)
26-44 =1 (this would be his wife Sarah, but she is 45. I would say close enough on this.)

Now let’s looks at the Queensbury entry. Remember this one is right after the Norman Phelps, Junior entry (whose age and wife’s age are correct, no children yet) so we would presume it would be the correct entry.
 
Phelps, Norman (I624)
 
121 1830 on 1870 census Hider, Charlotte (I259)
 
122 1834 Kukkus Census has her as a daughter-in-law to Johann Martin Kisselman (b. 1773-74). The death certificate of her daughter, Elisabeth, in AuGres, Michigan shows parents of Godfred Keselman and Louisa Schwangel, both of Russia. The 1834 census has Katharina Louisa living in HH#17 while Konrad Schengel is living in HH#18. Konrad is probably her grandfather. He would have been 62 when she was born. Probably his son, Johann Heinrich is the father. He was having children in that time period. There is also a Katharina Louisa Schengel born 1816, who is definately a different person. So there is more than one Schengel family having children in that time period.
 
Schengel, Katharina Louisa (I5785)
 
123 1840 census shows military pensioner Eliphalet Gordon age 82 living in the household. (This info is on the 2nd page). Presumably this would be the father or grandfather of Deborah Gordon. Bowen, Emory Henry (I6953)
 
124 1840 census shows military pensioner Eliphalet Gordon age 82 living in the household. (This info is on the 2nd page). Presumably this would be the father or grandfather of Deborah Gordon. Gordon, Deborah Elizabeth (I6954)
 
125 1850 and 1860 census have birthplace of New Jersey. 1870 census has birthplace of England. Various children's records have father born in England. Probate in 1877 leaves house to daughter Mary E Warner. Rowling, Joshua (I681)
 
126 1850 census appears as Julius Irish!! This apparently caused an erroneous Julius Irish entry to appear in many books and trees. However, this name does not appear again. The children are the children of Norman Irish (deceased) and Judith Jenkins Irish. The sex is female. Apparently this is just an entry error for Judith Irish. Jenkins, Judith (I352)
 
127 1850 census for Gottfried Kisselman and the entire household #30 is obscured and cannot be read. Kisselman, Gottfried (I5784)
 
128 1850 living in Fort Ann
1860 living in Richfield Township, Michigan with Varnis Maxfield and Percy Irish (dau of David Irish and Sally Phelps)
1870 living in Queensbury, New York with Norman and Minerva Phelps and his mother Eveline Phelps, Brown Dickenson.

Brown, Norman W., Genesee County. Enlisted in company A, Eighth Infantry, as Wagoner, Aug. 7. 1861, at Flint, for 3 years, age 26. Mustered Sept. 23, 1861. On duty with Twentieth Infantry from Jan. 7. 1864, to March 1, 1864. Discharged at expiration of term of service before Petersburg, Va., Sept. 22, 1864.

This is from:
"Record of service of Michigan volunteers in the civil war, 1861-1865, Volume 8" 
Brown, Norman W (I4330)
 
129 1860 census has father and mother born ohio-not ny and pa. May have wrong people here. Conklin, Almira Elizabeth (I105)
 
130 1860 census has father and mother born ohio-not ny and pa. May have wrong people here. Conklin, James E. (I6435)
 
131 1860 census has father and mother born ohio-not ny and pa. May have wrong people here. Brown, Catherine Elizabeth (I6436)
 
132 1860 census has father and mother born ohio-not ny and pa. May have wrong people here. Conklin, James M (I6437)
 
133 1860 census has father and mother born ohio-not ny and pa. May have wrong people here. Conklin, Edward (I6438)
 
134 1860 census has father and mother born ohio-not ny and pa. May have wrong people here. Conklin, Mary E (I6439)
 
135 1860 census has father and mother born ohio-not ny and pa. May have wrong people here. Conklin, Gerlenia (I6440)
 
136 1860 census has father and mother born ohio-not ny and pa. May have wrong people here. Conklin, Elanora (I6441)
 
137 1860 census has father and mother born ohio-not ny and pa. May have wrong people here. Conklin, Arteliza (I6442)
 
138 1860 U.S. census, population schedule. NARA microfilm publication M653, 1,438 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d. Source (S556)
 
139 1870 Source (S9)
 
140 1870 census has mother born ohio not pa--may have wrong family here. Conklin, Almira Elizabeth (I105)
 
141 1870 census has mother born ohio not pa--may have wrong family here. Brown, Catherine Elizabeth (I6436)
 
142 1870 living in residence of Alexander and Phoebe Carpenter. DeGroat, Anna M (I7069)
 
143 1870 living in residence of Alexander and Phoebe Carpenter. DeGroat, Lydia (I7071)
 
144 1883 per 1900 census Carmona, Jose (I6629)
 
145 1900 census shows his parents had 6 children with 3 still living. He was not one of the 3 living. Frana, Tonda {Tony} J (I3876)
 
146 1910 and 1929 census show living at 1011 thirty third st in bay city. 1897 city directory shows living at 2313 Fitzhugh, Bay City with James and Charlotte (Hider) Flood Melvin, Edgar B (I465)
 
147 1921 Flint City Directory-Alice Phelps widow of Jerome bds 906 e 8th St Living with daughter Maud ---1910 census same address.

Flint Journal 12 Sep 1932
Mrs. Alice F Phelps, 82 years old, resident of Flint and vicinity all her life, died yesterday at the home of a daughter, Mrs. Edith Pangborn of Swartz Creek, after an illness of four months. Born May 23, 1850 at Otisville, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jeremia Thompson, she married Jerome Phelps Sept. 26, 1886 (typo, should be 1868) at Atlas. She was a member of the Atlas Baptist Church. Surviving are two daughters, Mrs. Pangborn of Swartz Creek and Mrs. Maud Riegle of Flint; a sister Mrs. Gertrude Russell of New York state; five grandchildren and 10 great grandchildren.

1910 Census says 3 children/2 living. It would appear should be 4 children/3 living. Unless Reuben A had died by that time, then would be 4/2? Alice obit shows 2 children surviving. We have arthur obit 1904. What about Reuben A???--Answer to this is that Reuben A is actually son of Leander whose wife died!! so 3/2 is corect.

DOD from Genesee county clerk death lookup 
Thompson, Alice Fuller (I908)
 
148 1930 census and 1960 obit both show 712 Charleston St Felsing, Anna Barbara (I2235)
 
149 1930 census lives next to major campbell
1900 census lives next to stephen gordon
 
Taylor, Delmore (I897)
 
150 1930 census living with Sherman Schwalin-great grand son---also lives next to delmar taylor

George and Major are probably the same person
 
Campbell, Major (I1874)
 
151 1930 Census--living with his parents Irish, Orville (I376)
 
152 1940 census age and birth state appears to be in error by quite a bit. Gifford, Lavern (I196)
 
153 1970's-1980's Felsing, Katharina (I2035)
 
154 19th President of the United States (1877-1881) Hayes, Rutherford Birchard (I4355)
 
155 1st husband Family F821
 
156 1st wife Family F987
 
157 1st wife Family F1021
 
158 1st wife Family F928
 
159 1st wife Family F1037
 
160 1st wife Family F1132
 
161 1st wife Family F5517
 
162 1st wife Family F5514
 
163 2 1/2 mos old at death Felsing, Roger George (I1007)
 
164 2 Jun 1963 Caruthers, Cecil Dewey (I2048)
 
165 2/1/1904 Flint Daily News-Flint, Michigan

(HEADLINE:) She lived alone near her son. When found her body was found lying on the bed with the clothing burned off.

Mrs. Mary Phelps met with a terrible death last evening, shortly before 6 o'clock, being burned to death at her home on the farm of her son, Jerome, on Atherton Street in Burton.
Mrs. Phelps lived alone in a little house about 4 rods east of the residence of the son named, and (her) grandson Arthur, living several rods east of her. Last evening, between 5 and 6 o'clock her son went to the house where his mother lived to fix the fire and found her seated before the stove. He did what was necessary to the stove and cautioned the old lady, who was about eighty-six, not to meddle with the fire. Shortly before 6 o’clock Arthur left his house to go to the barn to harness a horse to take two ladies who were visiting him to the electric railway station at Morrish’s crossing, and while passing the house smelled smoke. He groped his way to the chair in which his grandmother usually sat, and finding her not there ran to the bed, on which he found her lying. He was unable to carry her out and called for his father. Together they carried the bed out of the house and found Mrs. Phelps was dead. Her clothing had been burned off her body and the bed clothing had been burned. It is supposed that her clothing caught fire and she rushed to the bed and threw herself upon it in the hope that the fire would be extinguished by so doing, or that a spark set fire to her dress and she went to bed, and while lying down the spark burst into a blaze and she was burned to death. The two young ladies who were visiting the younger Phelps passed the house a few minutes before Arthur did and smelled nothing.
Mrs. Phelps was born in New York and came to Davison with her husband, R.G. Phelps about 50 years ago. They lived in Davison for about twenty years and then moved to Burton where Mr. Phelps died about twenty-five years ago. She is survived by six children. They are Jerome, of Burton; Leander, of Saginaw; Eugene, who lives in California; Mrs. Delos Cole, of St. Johns; Mrs. Adaline Thompson, who lives near Millington, and Alice of Gratiot county.
Dr. Charles was notified and went to Burton last night, but did not deem an inquest necessary.
The funeral will be held on Wednesday at 10 a.m. from the home of her son, Jerome. Interment will be made in the Kitchen cemetery in Davison.

(death certificate lists cause of death-smothered by smoke) (death certificate list John Crosette as her father, mother unknown). Deed in Fort Ann, Washington County, New York 7/12/1849, Reuben G. Phelps and his wife Mary purchased land in Fort Ann from John Crosett and his wife Lucy. Deed Liber book 21. page 178.
 
Crossett, Mary (I111)
 
166 2/21/1641? Cooke, Aaron (I4423)
 
167 22nd and 24th President of the United States Cleveland, Stephen Grover (I4422)
 
168 28 Sep 1719 Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, USA
?[357] Timothy owned the Half-Way Cov't, W. Ch., 8 Nov 1663; freeman at Windsor 1664; received his commission as Lieut. under Col. Wm. Whiting, with Capt. Matthew Allyn, in 1709, in Queen Anne's War. He resided in Windsor on the original Phelps homestead.

Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, USA

DEATH: I, Timothy Phelps of Windsor, being very aged yet retaining a good measure of understanding and memory, do make this my last will and testament: Imprimis. I give, devise and bequeath all my estate whatsoever, both real and personal, to my three sons, William, Cornelius and Samuel, to have, hold and improve the same in trust for the use of my wife during her natural life, and after her decease my will is, and I hereby do give and devise all my houseing and lands with the appurtenances to my sons Timothy Phelps, William Phelps, Cornelius Phelps, Samuel Phelps, Nathaniel Phelps, and heirs of Joseph Phelps in the room of their father, to be equally divided into six equal parts, provided always, and it is my will, that they pay and make up to their sisters, Sarah, Hannah, Ann and Martha, my daughters, or to their heirs, and to the heirs of my daughter Abigail deceased, â48 as money apiece; and my will is that what they have already recd. as entered upon my book shall be reckoned as part of sd. summs, and yt my sd. sons and the heirs of my son Joseph shall pay their sisters and their heirs above mentioned in equal proportion, except that the heirs of Joseph shall pay â4 more than an equal proportion, and my son Cornelius â4 less than an equal proportion. And my will further is, that my wife shall have the free disposal of all her wearing apparell at her decease, and that my grandson Samuel Fyler shall have half of that bequeathed to the heirs of my daughter Abigail if he liveth with me so long as I live, or till he comes to the age of 18 years. I appoint my wife Mary and my three sons, William, Cornelius and Samuel, to be executors.

Witness: John Mansfield, Thomas Moore.

Timothy X Phelps, ls.

And whereas, I being aged and my wife soe, and not knowing how long it may please God to continue my life, and not knowing what debts and charge may arise before I leave this world, my will is that my sons and my daughters and their heirs shall pay their equal parts and shares of my debts and charges after my decease. And my daughters, Sarah, Hannah, Ann and Martha, and the heirs of Abigail, shall have â46 apiece with what they have already had, to be paid as money out of my estate after my decease. By the charge as above mentioned I intend that if there be any extraordinary charge, so that the improvement of my estate will not maintain me. This addition of my will was made and published the 2nd day of March, 1716.

Witness: John Mansfield, Thomas Moore.

Timothy X Phelps, ls.

These witnesses appeared 28 September, 1719, and made oath that they saw Timothy Phelps sign and seal the will with the addition, before Matthew Allyn, Assistant.

Court Record, Page 112--6 October, 1719: Will exhibited and proven. William Phelps to be guardian to Samuel Fyler, son of Samuel Fyler, late of Hebron deceased, a minor about 10 years of age.

Page 118--19 January, 1719-20: Order to dist. the estate according to the will, by Ebenezer Fitch, John Palmer and Abram Phelps.

Page 5 (Vol. XII) 13 May, 1734: Jonathan Phelps of Northampton, Mass., heir by will to Capt. Timothy Phelps of Windsor, moves this Court that a division of the lands be made to the heirs. This Court appoint Capt. Henry Allyn, Lt. Roger Newbery and Lt. John Cook to set out by meets and bounds according to the will of sd. deceased.
 
Phelps, Timothy (I651)
 
169 2nd husb Family F1893
 
170 2nd husb Family F1125
 
171 2nd husband Family F944
 
172 2nd husband Family F902
 
173 2nd wife Family F1047
 
174 2nd wife Family F148
 
175 2nd wife Family F618
 
176 2nd wife Family F943
 
177 2nd wife Family F1124
 
178 2nd wife Family F5518
 
179 2nd wife of Johann Andreas Reitz Sinner, Eva Catherina (I3396)
 
180 2nd wife of Johannes Reitz Becker, Catharina (I2629)
 
181 3b 144 Pendred, William Sr (I3758)
 
182 3b 269 Pendred, Charles Henry (I3703)
 
183 3b 278 Pendred, William Groom (I3766)
 
184 3b 278 Lincoln, William (I3785)
 
185 3B 401 Family F1193
 
186 3b 545 Family F1184
 
187 3b 721 Family F1194
 
188 3rd wife Family F910
 
189 4 days after his father Dimbleby, Roger (I6339)
 
190 4/23/1861--where from Irish, Julius (I353)
 
191 4/6/1904 George Seeley Male white married 42y om 10d pod Bay City Hemorrage of lungs born mich laborer parents George Seeley & Marie (Timball?) dor 5/5/1904 Seeley, George (I794)
 
192 5/3/1888 Felsing, Jacob (I2739)
 
193 6 months old- abt jan 1850 Irish, Eve (I292)
 
194 6/14/1909 marriage date does not seem correct-book g begins 1914?? unless it is a very late entry? date is from a familysearch.org entry Family F166
 
195 6/30/1614 Family F1631
 
196 6th Ward Seeley, William (I802)
 
197 7/29/07-checked cass city chronicle for obit--none Shultz, Mary Ann (I816)
 
198 8 mos. old in May 1910 Beardsley, Roy Lavern (I4250)
 
199 Maj. Gen. Noah Phelps (1) (born January 22, 1740, descended from the immigrant William Phelps) settled in Simsbury, Connecticut., where he was an active and influential man. He was a Yale graduate, a justice of the Peace, judge of Probate for twenty years, and was a Delegate to the Convention of 1787 to ratify the Federal Constitution. Early in the breaking out of the Revolutionary War he was chosen as a member of "Committee of War for the expedition against Ticonderoga and Crown Point."
The committee considered the advisability of taking Fort Ticonderoga, then occupied by the British, and in which there was stored a large amount of heavy artillery and other war implements. Capt. Phelps, Barnard Romance, Ephraim Buell, and Capt. Edward Mott, with others, composed this committee, Capt. Mott acting as chairman. £300 was raised from the Public Treasury though guaranteed by several patriotic gentlemen. This fund was placed in the hands of Capt. Phelps and Barnard Romance, with the request that they should go north and press forward this project. This resulted in the great and bloodless victory - the taking of Fort Ticonderoga.
It may be interesting to his descendants to know the part Capt. Phelps acted as a spy. At the southern part of Lake Champlain, Capt. Phelps was sent out to reconnoiter. He stopped over night at a farm house some little distance from Fort Ticonderoga. Some British soldiers occupied rooms adjoining Capt. Phelps, where they were having a dinner party. Capt. Phelps heard them discuss the condition of the fort, and the position taken by the rebels, as they styled the people. Early the next morning Capt. Phelps visited the fort disguised as a peddler.
"Pretending that his object was to get shaved, he avoided suspicion, and had an opportunity to ascertain the construction, strength, and force of the garrison. And he had the good fortune to elude detection, though as it afterwards appeared, his presence had began [sic] to excite mistrust before he left the garrison."
While returning through the fort, the commander accompanied him talking with him about the rebels, their object and movements. Capt. Phelps seeing a portion of the wall in a dilapidated condition, remarked that it would afford a feeble defence against the rebels, if they should attack in that quarter. The commander replied, " Yes, but that is not our greatest misfortune. All our powder is damaged, and before we can use it, we are obliged to dry and sift it."
The Phelps Homestead Erected by Captain Elisha Phelps in 1776, who with his brother, General Noah Phelps, and others, was actively engaged in the capture of Ft. Ticonderoga. After the death of Captain Phelps, this old homestead was purchased by his nephew, Colonel Noah Amherst Phelps. (1) It was operated by three sucessive generations of Phelps tavernkeepers as a tavern and inn from 1786 to 1849. The Simsbury Historical Society <../geo/simsbury.htm> now owns and operates the Phelps Tavern Museum and Homestead located on two-plus acres in the center of Simsbury, Connecticut.
Capt. Phelps soon after left the fort, employing a boatman to take him down the lake in a small boat. He entered the boat in full view and under the guns of the fort. He requested the boatman to exert himself and terminate the journey as soon as possible, The boatman then requested him to take an oar and assist, This the Capt. declined to do, being in full sight of the fort, by saying he was no boatman. After rounding a point that intercepted a view from the fort, the Capt. proposed taking an oar, which he did, and being a strong active man as well as a good oarsman, he excited the suspicion of the oarsman by his efficient work, who remarked with an oath, 'You have seen an oar before now, sir.' This excited the suspicion of the boatman at the time that he was not a good and loyal citizen, but fear of superior strength prevented an attempt to carry him back to the fort. This he confessed to Capt. Phelps after the surrender of the fort. Capt. Phelps returned safely to his command, reported the information he had gained [to General Ethan Allen], resulting in the great and glorious victory before referred to." (2)
About this time Mr. Phelps raised a company mostly at his own expense, and was appointed Captain. He served under Col. Ward, was at Fort Lee, joined Washington's army, and was at the battles of Trenton and Princeton. Later he acted as commissary, and after the war was chosen Maj. Gen. of Militia.
Noah Phelps was clearly a leader within the Simsbury community. He chaired the town meeting that passed the articles of confederation in January 1778, and in November of 1787, the meeting picked him and Daniel Humphrey Esq., as delegates for the Convention of the State of Connecticut, set to convene in Hartford in January and vote on whether or not to adopt the federal constitution. They were directed to oppose it, but "one of the delegates though voting as instructed by the town, took occasion to state that his personal convictions led him to favor the proposed constitution."(3) This might or might not have been Phelps. He held a variety of important positions, including Surveyor of lands in 1772 and 1783, Justice of the Peace for Hartford County in 1782, Judge of Probate in 1787, and Major-General of the Militia, 1796-1799.
He died in Simsbury 4 Nov., 1809, honored and respected. On his tombstone is inscribed: "A Patriot of 1776. To such we are indebted for our Independence."
 
Phelps, Noah (I1603)
 
200 Find A Grave. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi. Source (S677)
 
201 General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration. T288, 546 rolls. Source (S668)
 
202 Index of Awards on Claims of the Soldiers of the War of 1812. New York Adjutant General's Office. New York State Archives, Albany, NY. Source (S705)
 
203 Marriage Records. Kentucky Marriages. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, UT. Source (S685)
 
204 Marriage Records. Michigan Marriages. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, UT. Source (S681)
 
205 Obituary Finder. Mount Pleasant, Isabella, Michigan, United States: Chippewa River District Library System. http://207.75.101.222/evanced/obitsystem/obitview.asp: accessed 21 February 2012. Source (S667)
 
206 Pennsylvania Marriage Records. Harrisburg, PA: Pennsylvania Archives Printed Series, 1876. Series 2, Series 6. Source (S694)
 
207 War of 1812 abstracts of payrolls for New York State militia ("payroll cards"), 1812–1814. Series B0810 (23.5 cu. ft.). New York (State). Adjutant General’s Office. New York State Archives, Albany, New York. Source (S706)
 
208 War of 1812 Pension Applications. Washington D.C.: National Archives. NARA Microfilm Publication M313, 102 rolls. Records of the Department of Veterans Affairs, Record Group Number 15. Source (S708)
 
209 Wesleyan Methodist Baptismal Register. Ontario, Canada: RootsWeb. http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~wjmartin/wesleyan.htm: accessed 15 March 2012. Source (S691)
 
210

Cuyahoga County, Ohio, Marriage Records, 1810–1973. Microfilm publication, 137 rolls. Reels 1-110. Cuyahoga, Ohio.

 
Source (S707)
 
211

Dutch Reformed Church Records from New York and New Jersey. Holland Society of New York, New York, New York.


Dutch Reformed Church Records from New Jersey. The Archives of the Reformed Church in America, New Brunswick, New Jersey.

 
Source (S675)
 
212

Michigan. Divorce records. Michigan Department of Community Health, Division for Vital Records and Health Statistics, Lansing, Michigan.

 
Source (S666)
 
213
  • 1855 Kansas Territory Census. Microfilm reel K-1. Kansas State Historical Society.
  • 1856, 1857, and 1858 Kansas Territory Censuses. Microfilm reel K-1. Kansas State Historical Society.
  • 1859 Kansas Territory Census. Microfilm reel K-1. Kansas State Historical Society.
  • 1865 Kansas State Census. Microfilm reels K-1 – K-8. Kansas State Historical Society.
  • 1875 Kansas State Census. Microfilm reels K-1 – K-20. Kansas State Historical Society.
  • 1885 Kansas State Census. Microfilm reels K-1 – K-146. Kansas State Historical Society.
  • 1895 Kansas State Census. Microfilm reels K-1 – K-169. Kansas State Historical Society.
  • 1905 Kansas State Census. Microfilm reels K-1 - K-181. Kansas State Historical Society.
  • 1915 Kansas State Census. Microfilm reels K-1 – K-271. Kansas State Historical Society.
  • 1925 Kansas State Census. Microfilm reels K-1 – K-177. Kansas State Historical Society.
 
Source (S711)
 
214
  • Archives of Ontario. Registrations of Births and Stillbirths – 1869-1913. MS 929, reels 1-245. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Archives of Ontario.
  • Archives of Ontario. Delayed Registrations and Stillbirths, “50” Series, 1869-1911, 1913. MS 930, reels 1-67, 73-74. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Archives of Ontario.
  • Archives of Ontario. Delayed Registrations of Births and Stillbirths, “90” Series, 1869-1911, 1913. MS 933, reels 1-64, 68. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Archives of Ontario.
  • Archives of Ontario. Direct Clergy Returns for Simcoe County Births, Marriages, and Deaths, 1892-1896. MS 936, 1 reel. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Archives of Ontario.
  • Archives of Ontario. Evidence for Delayed Registrations of Births, 1861-1897. MS 946, 2 reels. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Archives of Ontario.
  • Archives of Ontario. Division Registrar Vital Statistics Records, 1858-1930. MS 940, reels 1-4, 10-15, 17-20, 22-25, 27-28. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Archives of Ontario.
 
Source (S680)
 
215
  • Barber, Gertrude A., comp. Deaths taken from the "Brooklyn Eagle." Volumes 1-27. n.p.: n.p., 1963-66.
  • Barber, Gertrude A., comp. Deaths taken from the New York Evening Post. Volumes 1-54. n.p.: n.p., 1933-47.
 
Source (S697)
 
216 ? on last name Trimble, Lillian May (I928)
 
217 ? on last name Demeratz, Minnie L (I929)
 
218 ?? Beardsley, Roy Lavern (I4250)
 
219 A DIGEST OF THE EARLY CONNECTICUT PROBATE RECORDS. 1715 to 1723.

Page 99 Name: Joseph Phelps Location: Windsor

Invt. â341-16-11. Taken 26 September, 1716, by James Enno, Timothy Loomisand John Palmer. Will dated 23 August, 1716.

I, Joseph Phelps, Sen., do make this my last will and testament: After myjust debts be paid, I give unto my wife Sarah the use and improvement of1-3 part of my estate, both personal and real, during her natural life;also, I give to my wife a new Bible. It is my will that my estate shallbe divided equally amongst my ten children: Joseph, Daniel, Edward, John,Abell, Ichabod, Jonathan, Mary, Sarah and Abigail. I appoint my sonDaniel and my wife Sarah to be executors.
Witness: Jonathan Brown, William Phelps.

Joseph Phelps, ls.

Court Record, Page 23--2 October, 1716: Edward Phelps, 18 years of age,John 16, Mary 13, children of Joseph Phelps, chose Samuel Phelps to betheir guardian. This Court appoint William Phelps to be guardian toAbell, age 11 years, Ichabod, 9 years. Will exhibited by Sarah and DanielPhelps.

Page 25--1st April, 1716-17: Sarah Phelps, widow, accepts the trust ofexecutrix.

Page 60--1st April, 1718: The executors exhibit an account. Accepted.Order to dist. the remaining part of the estate to Sarah Phelps, widow,to Joseph, Daniel, Edward, John, Abell, Ichabod, Jonathan, Mary andAbigail Phelps. And appoint Thomas Moore, James Enno and John Bissell,distributors.

See File: Dist. of the estate, 1st April, 1718: To the widow, to Joseph,to Daniel, to Edward, to John, to Abell, to Ichabod, to Jonathan, toMatthew Griswold in right of his wife Mary Phelps, and to Sarah andAbigail Phelps. By Thomas Moore and John Bissell.

Page 69 (Vol. X) 2 February, 1724-5: Report of the distributors.

Page 220--3 June, 1729: This Court appoint Cornelius Phelps of Windsor tobe guardian to Jonathan Phelps, a minor, age 17 years. Recog., 50. 
Phelps, Joseph (I604)
 
220 A Digest of the Early Connecticut Probate Records: Hartford district, 1635-1700

Volume 1, Page 494
Osborn, Widow Ann, Windsor. Died 28 August, 1689. (W. R.) Invt. £91-01-00. Taken 31 October, 1689, by Samuel Grant and Isaac
Morgan. The Legatees: John Osborn, age 43 years, Nathaniel Osborn 36, Mary Owen, Samuel Osborn 26, Hester Owen 22, Sarah Wright 20, Hannah Egleston 24.
Court Record, Page 4-6 November, 1689: Invt. Exhibited of Mrs. Ann Osborn's Estate. Adms. to John & Samuel Osborn. Nathaniel Bis- sell & Job Drake, son of John Drake, to Distribute the Estate.
Note: John Osband & Ann Oldage m. 19 May, 1645.-(W. R.)
 
Oldage, Anne (I2275)
 
221 A Digest of the Early Connecticut Probate Records: Hartford district, 1635-1700
Vol 1, Page 347-48
Phelps, Joseph, Simsbury. Invt. £84-09-06. Taken 5 March, 1683- 4, by John Terry, Joshua Holcomb & John Case. The children: Joseph 17 years of age, Hannah 15, William 13 years, Sarah 11 years, and Timo- thy 4 years of age.
Court Record, Page 87-6 March, 1684: An Invt. of the Estate of Joseph Phelps was exhibited in Court, proven & ordered to be recorded. And this Court grants Adms, to the Widow, £6 of the Personal Estate& 1-3 of the Real Estate during her natural life, and to the Eldest son £22, and to the rest of the Children £11 apeice. And Timothy Phelps, Thomas Barber and John Terry are desired to be Overseers,
See File: The Petition of Mary Phelps, Relict to Joseph Phelps, of Symsbury, To the Honourable County Court now sitting at Hartford, Humbly showeth: That your poor Petitioner, when shee married to Joseph Phelps, was a widow, And was left by her former husband hi some- what a comfortable Condition. And after shee was married to this man, carried a considerable Estate with her to the value of £40 or £50, but since his decease is left in a very helpless Condition; having but £6 allowed In Moveable estate, with the third of the Land for life, which will not yield above 20 Shillings per Annum, which is but a very small matter to maintain me, having a young child left By Joseph Phelps, my deceased husband, to be brought up out of it. Having therefore heard of the Readyness of this Court to hear the cry & to help the fatherless and the Widow, made me Bold humbly to move your honours that some more of the Estate may be settled upon me for the Bringing up of the Child. How-ever, if the matter be difficult, that at least you would be pleased to order that I might have that mare and Cow that is left and was part of my own Estate which I carried with me when I married my late husband. Hop- ing your honours will take the matter into serious Consideration, I shal not farther enlarge, but, begging Gods presence with you, rest your hum- ble Petitioner.
Northapt, 28 August, 1684. mary phelps.
 
Phelps, Joseph (I1600)
 
222 A genealogy prepared by Dr. Igor Pleve Source (S200)
 
223 A native of Germany, George Zulch was working as laborer in Detroit in the summer of 1862. He enlisted in company A on August 4, 1862 at Detroit. He was 34. George mustered into federal service on August 13, 1862.
Although the State Adjutant General indicates that George Zulch was missing in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 1, 1863, he was in fact badly wounded. He suffered four separate wounds. A likely scenario is that in the immediate aftermath of the battle, the company sergeant was unable to locate him in one of the field hospitals. Perhaps he was unable to speak. Perhaps he was one of the first to be evacuated to a more permanent facility.
He returned to the Regiment on October 29, 1863. Field duty prove too much for him, however. On February 16, 1864 he was transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps on account of wounds received in action. George Zulch was discharged at Elmira, New York on November 14, 1865. This unit was assigned to guard duty at the infamous Elmira Prison
 
Zulch, George (I1898)
 
224 A personal genealogical summary written by Heinrich and Anna Margaretha Krum Source (S487)
 
225 A record exists of marriage of James Caruthers to Martha P Brooks 20 Dec 1830 in Augusta County, Virginia. This may be the same person. Unknown, Martha (I4966)
 
226 A surname chart of Village inhabitants with the same surname. Prepared from various Russian records including church records, transport records, immigration records and census lists. Source (S403)
 
227 A Surname Chart prepared by Dr. Igor Pleve Source (S204)
 
228 Abigail born 1693 and Abigail born 1714 appear to be the same person! See her fathers will, Abigail is listed, but is not listed as a minor. This person, b. 1714, should probably be removed, but I will leave here here, as most of the published genealogies show her. Phelps, Abigail (I547)
 
229 abt 1696 Messenger, Abigail (I7460)
 
230 abt 1877 Campbell, Alva (I1870)
 
231 According the "The Phelps Family of America" book Elisha left Connecticut to move to Scipio, Cayuga, New York to be near where some of his children, where he died in 1818. Phelps, Elisha (I7296)
 
232 According to Genealogies (first families) at the Provincial Archives of New Brunswick, Canada; Thomas Corey and Catherine Vail moved from New York to New Brunswick in 1783 as Loyalists. They first settled at Gagetown, Queens County then on Washademoak Lake.

Title: The Cory family : a genealogy
Authors: Cory, Harry Harmon,
City of Publication: Minneapolis, Minn.
Publisher: Argus Pub. Co.
Date: 1941

This genealogy of the Cory family is available on-line on MEL 
Corey, Thomas (I3521)
 
233 According to Genealogies (first families) at the Provincial Archives of New Brunswick, Canada; Thomas Corey and Catherine Vail moved from New York to New Brunswick in 1783 as Loyalists. They first settled at Gagetown, Queens County then on Washademoak Lake. Vail, Catherine (I3522)
 
234 According to Genealogies at the Provincial Archives of New Brunswick, Canada Sarah was married 1st to William Lounsbury and 2nd to Alexander Campbell and then moved to Ontario. However the Brant County, Ontario Gen web at http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~onbrant/biosbran1.htm has a biography of her son Morris that shows that it was William and Sarah (not Alexander) who moved from New Brunswick and all children are Lounsburys. So it would seem that either Alexander Campbell was the first husband, who did not move to Ontario or it is simply in error and he was not a husband. See Morris Lounsbury (b. 1831) for full writeup. Corey, Sarah (I3505)
 
235 According to "Families of old Fairfield" Thomas died 1658, wife's name unknown. He had three children including our Samuel who married Rebecca Odell.

This is quote from a website which is quite interesting, and is mostly, although not completely confirmed:
(http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~nancyelder/Morehouse.htm)
Thomas Morehouse, recognized as the emigrant ancestor of most of the American Morehouse families, was in Watertown, Massachusetts, about 1635; at Wethersfield, Connecticut, 1640; at
Stamford, Connecticut, in 1641, where he was one of the original settlers who purchased the
townsite from the Indians for one hundred bushels of corn. He came from Yorkshire, England,
with the migration of Puritans conducted by Sir Richard Saltonstall. He settled permanently at
Fairfield, Connecticut, prior to 1653 and became prominent in its development--owning the
tide-water mill and being sent as a member to the General Court (Legislature) at Hartford. He left
four sons--Samuel, Thomas, Jonathan and John--who at an early date became the heads of the
numerous branches and descendants which settled in New York, New Jersey, Ohio and the West.
Thomas Morehouse, the first, died at Fairfield in 1658, leaving a will. It is estimated that over two hundred of his descendants served in the Revolutionary war.

Partial confirmation of the above story includes NEHGR Vol98, P75, Vol49 P475 and Vol113 P301. And "The Early Settlement of Stamford, Conn 1641-1700" 1990 by Jeanne Majdalany.
The corn story is a little misleading; The New Haven Colony had earlier purchased the land from the Indians for 100 bushels of corn and then later sold the same land to the group of Puritans who would first settle there. The name Thomas Morehouse is on the list of the 29 Puritan families which settled Rippowam (The Indian name) in 1641. The name was changed to Stamford in 1642. I have not found a confirmation that he was with Sir Richard Saltonstall and that he was from Yorkshire. Saltonstall had led a group of immigrants to settle at Watertown in 1630. Perhaps Morehouse came later as there is no record of him before 1635.

This entry from "The History of Fairfield" by Elizabeth Hubbell Schenck 1889 discusses his will, although I do not have a transcript of the will:
Thomas Morehouse was at Wethersfield, says Savage, in 1640. He was among the first to receive a grant of seven acres in Stamford. He is found at Fairfield before 1653, where he had purchased the house & home-lot of John Barlow on the Ludlow Square. He was granted land by the town on the west side of the Uncoway River & present Black Rock Bridge, where he ran a grist mill on the creek which empties into the river between Seely's Neck & the Old Mill hill He m Isabella d of Ralph Keeler of Norwalk. His will is dated 8 Aug 1658 in which he leaves 1/3 of his estate to his wife Isabell; a double portion to his eldest son Samuel, homestead, mill & mill-lot, which he was not to sell without the consent of the town; & further distributes his estate among his sons Thomas, John, Jonathan & ds Mary & Ann He mentions daughter Hannah, to whom he had aIready given a full portion

The marriage to Isabel Keeler is an apparent error as his son Thomas married Isabel Keeler, the daughter of Ralph Keeler.
 
Morehouse, Thomas (I4483)
 
236 According to family tradition William E was an inventor who had a patent for an improvement to the breech-loading cannon. Unable to sell or otherwise make money off his patent in the United States he traveled to Prussia and sold his idea for an unknown sum of money to Krupp Manufacturing, the well-known arms manufacturer in Germany. It is said that due to the cold weather, Mr. Krupp gave William E a heavy winter coat with gold buttons. After he returned to the United States, his brother Thomas stole his gold buttons! (names may have been changed in the retelling, we do not show a bother named Thomas).

BIRTH:
Based on the Federal and State Census records William E Osborne was born 1801 to 1803 in Connecticut. (The handwriting on the 1865 New York State Census which could be Canada is obviously an error). His father Israel Osborne was living in East Windsor, Connecticut from 1796 or earlier to at least 1811 based on East Windsor Real Estate records). An 1855 passport record states that is was 50 years old and born in East Windsor, Connecticut (which would imply born 1805).

MARRIAGE:
First wife- Unknown. We only know there is a first wife by the 1865 New York State Census where he states he was married 2 times.
Second wife- Ann Eliza Unknown. Marriage date by 1855 for birth of William and certainly by 1859 (based on William E and Ann E signing off on a real estate deed in connection with his fathers estate). Her maiden name may be McPherson. Her son in law listed Eliza McPherson as his first wife (who passed away) on a naval pension document. His first wife was Lida Osborne. Perhaps Eliza was Lida’s correct name. Perhaps Mcpherson was her mother’s name at the time Lida was born. Which could indicate that Ann Eliza already had Lida before she married William E. (according to the New York State Census Ann Eliza was on her first marriage and William his second.) Also, on the 1865 New York State Census, a sister Emeline Mcfeeson (McPherson??) is living in the Osborne household. Emeline being 39 years younger than William and 14 years younger than Ann Eliza was probably the sister of Ann Eliza, not William.

DEATH: after 1878.
1878 is the last entry we find for William Osborne in the Rochester City Directory. We can find no record of William E Osborne after this date.

LIVED IN:
Abt 1802 to abt 1811 lived with parents in East Windsor, Connecticut
Abt 1811 to abt 1825 with parents in Brighton, Monroe, New York
30 April 1831 Patent document-living in Brighton, Monroe,New York
12 Sep 1854 Patent document--living in Milton, Ulster, New York
1 Mar 1855 Passport Document-signed in New York City, New York
5 Sep 1859 fathers estate settlement-living in Brooklyn, Kings New York
1862-1867 Brooklyn city directory-living in Brooklyn, Kings, New York
1865 New York Census-Brooklyn, Kings, New York
1868-1878 Rochester city directory-living in Rochester, Monroe, New York
1870 US census-Rochester, Monroe, New York
1875 New York Census-Rochester, Monroe, New York

PATENT DOCUMENTS:
30 Apr 1831 William E Osborn of Brighton, Monroe County, New York received patent # 6529X for "a twin cylinder and double concave thrashing machine."
12 Sep 1854 William E Osborn, of Milton, Ulster New York received patent number US11678A for certain new and useful Improvements in Breech-Loading Guns or Cannon.

PASSPORT DOCUMENTS:
1 Mar 1855 Wm E Osborn “50 years of age” “born in East Windsor, Connecticut”

TRAVEL RECORDS:
27 Jan 1856 Arrival in London from Hamburg, Germany. Wm E Osborn, machinist, resides in New York

OCCUPATION:
Listed occupation from various records:
1856 Ship Record machinist
1862 city directory Brooklyn Inventor
1865 city directory Brooklyn gasfitter
1865 NY Census Brooklyn laborer
1867 city directory Brooklyn gas
1865 city directory Rochester farmer
1870 Federal census Rochester gas burner salesman
1871 city directory Rochester gasfitter
1872 city directory Rochester gasfitter
1873 city directory Rochester gasfitter
1874 city directory Rochester gasfitter
1875 city directory Rochester gasfitter
1875 NY Census Rochester farmer
1876 city directory Rochester gasfitter
1877 city directory Rochester gasfitter

REAL ESTATE:
We have found no real estate transactions in the name of Wm E Osborn, but he does appear as an heir in connection with his fathers estate settlement.
Deed filed 5 Sep 1859 in Monroe County, New York liber 172 p 118 in connection with the estate of Israel osborn, lists the following as his heirs at law:
William E Osborn and wife Ann Eliza Osborn
Nathaniel W Osborn and his wife Roxy S Osborn
John A McGonegal and wife the former Ursula Osborn
Franklin Leggett and wife Susan M Leggett (He is son of the deceased Mary Osborn)
Charles I Osborn

CENSUS RECORDS:

1850 Federal Census. We are unable to identify William E Osborne on this census.

1855 New York State Census. We are unable to identify William E Osborne on this census.

1860 Federal Census. We are unable to identify William E Osborne on this census.

1865 New York State Census. We find William Osborn in Brooklyn, Kings, New York.
Wm Osborn 64 laborer b. Canada?
Ann E 39 wife b. Kings
Lida 21 child b. (can’t read occupation) Kings
Wm 10 child b. Kings
Emeline McFeeson? 25 sister b. Kings

1870 Federal Census. We find William Osburn in Rochester, Monroe, New York.
William 68 gasburner salesman b. Conn.
Ann E 43 wife b. New York
William 15 at school b. New York
Cornelius Melvin 34 Lumber sorter b. New York
Lida Melvin 27 boarding b. New York
Edgar Melvin 2 b. New York

1875 New York State Census. We find William Osburn in Rochester, Monroe, New York.
ward 7, page 100
896 frame house value $3000 #919
Name/age/sex/relation to head of household/State or County of birth/married or sgl/occupation/voter/owner of land
William Osburn/72/male/head/Connecticut/married/gas fitter/voter/owner of land
Anna Osburn/48/female/wife/New York/married
Charles Melvin/40/male/son-in-law/New York/married/Bookkeeper
Leidda Melvin/34/female/wife/New York/married
William H Osburn/20/male/son/Monroe/single/clerk in d.g. store
Edgar Melvin/7/male/grandson/Monroe
(Y?)dda Melvin/2/female/granddaughter/Monroe

1880 Federal Census. We are unable to locate William E Osborne on this census.

CHILDREN:
Any children with his unknown first wife are unknown.
Lida b. 1843 may have been the child of Ann Eliza before they married.
William b. 1855 was probably the child of William E (in particular the middle name of Hayden would seem to indicate he was named by Israel Osborn (after Israel’s mother Anna Hayden) and his second wife.
The 1865 census listed that Ann Eliza who was on her first marriage had 4 children. Considering the 25 year age difference between William E and Ann E, the 4 children may have been William’s children or a combination of William’s and Ann’s children.
It is therefore a possibility that William had two or three children that we do not know about.
The theory that William H and Lida are step-siblings helps us make sense of the marriage of William H’s daughter (Lillian) to Lida’s son (Edgar). A fufirst cousin marriage does not seem correct of people not living in a rural and/or isolated area. Also, the 25 year age difference makes it less likely that a 40 year old William married a 15 year old, which would be necessary for Lida to be his daughter.

OTHER NOTES:
It should also be noted that William E's grandparents John Hayden and Anna Trumbull were first cousins. Also, his great grandparents Ammi Trumbull and Sabra Gaylor were 2nd cousins.
 
Osborne, William E (I1263)
 
237 According to New England Historical & Genealogical Register 1954 P290: Elizabeth Pennoyer is a nice of a Harvard University benefactor. Any male descendant is entitled to the Pennoyer aid at Harvard.

See notes on Robert Pennoyer. 
Pennoyer, Elizabeth (I3534)
 
238 according to oneworld tree experience dewey is 6xgg of Mamie Eisenhower Dewey, Experience (I1101)
 
239 According to some other family trees and websites, Sarah is the daughter of Thomas Muddle and Mary Dadswell. However according to theweald.org, the Sarah Muddle who is the daughter of Thomas and Mary Dadswell was born 1718 and baptized 10 Aug 1718, making her much to young to be married in 1729. I have to conclude that the 1718 Sarah Muddle is a different person. Muddle, Sarah (I3729)
 
240 According to Stiles John Osborn "by tradition of Welsh origin" married Ann Oldage 19 May 1645 and died 27 Oct 1686. Ann died 28 Aug 1689.

Hinman said John was probably the son of John Osborn of Weymouth, Mass. But John of Weymouth's son named John who was born in 1629 had a different wife and had different children. So that statement is incorrect.

We do not know if John came to the colonies on his own or with a parent. Nor do we have any idea as to who his parents were.

According to Stiles John had almost 1000 acres of real estate in what is now called East Windsor.

A Digest of the Early Connecticut Probate Records: Hartford district, 1635-1700
Page 249-50.

Osborn, John sen., Windsor. Died 27 October, 1686. Invt. £315- 17-06. Taken 25 November, 1686, by Henry Wolcott, Jacob Drake, Dan- iel Hayden. Will dated 14 October, 1686.

I John Osborn sen. of Windsor do make this my last Will & Testa- ment : I give to my wife Ann Osborn my personal and real Estate during her natural life, except that parcell of Land only that I now improve at Namerick which I give to my son John, Within a year and a day after my decease. I give to my son Samuel my now dwelling house and Lands adjoyning, after mine and my wive's decease, he paying to his brothers and sisters such legacies as hereinafter shall be expressed. I give to my son Nathaniel that part of my house lott west side of Connecticut River, east of the Town Street, bounded North by John Gaylord Jr., south by Robert Watson, East by Isaac Pinney's Meadow, after the decease of my wife and myself. I give to my gr. son Daniel Prior my Wood lott above Namerick, bounded south by Jacob Drake, and £10. My son Samuel to pay his four sisters, Mary, Hanna, Ester & Sarah, £10 to Each. Samuel to pay my gr. child Hana Shadduck £5 in case she abide with my wife until 18 years of age or till my wives decease. I constitute my wife Ann sole Executrix, and desire Jacob Drake, Daniel Hayden & Nathaniel Gay- lord to be Overseers.
john X osborn sen.
Witness: Jacob Drake, Mary Drake.
Court Record, Page 128-3 March, 1686-7' Wil1 Proven.

On-line we find genealogies stating that John's parents, John Osborn and wife Susan Juggins were immigrants to Connecticut. This, however, apparently refers to the John Osborn of Weymouth, Mass.
 
Osborn, John (I2274)
 
241 According to Torrey's "New England Marriages Prior to 1700" Richard Oldage/Aldrich who died in 1661 was married to unknown by 1629. According to "Coe-Ward Memorial and Immigrant Ancestors" dated 1897, Richard Oldage was in Windsor by 1640, died 27 Jan 1661 and his property went to his only child Ann, spouse of John Osborn.

A Digest of the Early Connecticut Probate Records: Hartford district, 1635-1700
Vol 3, Page H
OLDAGE, RICHARD, Windsor. Died 27 January, 1660. Invt. taken by Deacon Gaylord and Humphrey Pinney.
And shortly after an Inventori was taken of the estat that he left conserning which before his death he had before witnes said that his will was that his sonn in law John Osbon should have all that he had and he was to alow him maintenanc whilst he lived and so was to take all and paye all.
Witnes: Mat;Grant, Tho:Dibble.
 
Oldage, Richard (I4639)
 
242 According to Tuscola County Probate records (packet 1-89) Lucinda and her husband Jesse Fox were named guardians to the younger children, Thomas, Harriet and Jesse Z in 1866.

http://www.txfannin.org/obits.php?per_id=35567
Name: Lucinda Fox
Birth: 03 Apr 1836
Death: 07 Dec 1893
Burial: 17 New Salem Cemetery Fannin Co. TX, USA
Inscription: Wife of Jesse
Notes: Stone with Jesse
TXFannin GenWeb #: 035567
This record last updated on 2011-08-19 at 02:39:01

I have found online trees stating Lucinda was born in Somerset, Pennsylvania. I have not been able to find source information for this location.
 
Shultz, Lucinda (I815)
 
243 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I6530)
 
244 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I6531)
 
245 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I6532)
 
246 Adopted by Mothers 2nd husband. They took his surname. Thaller, Louis M (I6897)
 
247 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I523)
 
248 Aft. 1904 Phelps, Alice (I551)
 
249 Aft. 1913 Bockel, Catharina Margaretha (I2643)
 
250 after 1877 Phelps, Amasa (I554)
 
251 after 1877 Phelps, Grace (I588)
 
252 after summer 1860 Chase, Thankful (I84)
 
253 age 1 mon-died of the croup Willey, Unknown (I5658)
 
254 age 1/4 on 1834 census which was dated 6 Oct 1834. Kisselmann, Elisabeth (I2088)
 
255 age 77 on gravestone Hill, Mary (I4481)
 
256 Age at Death: 56 Bowyer, Frederick Lee (I2128)
 
257 Age at Death: 61 Tomkins, Frederick G (I6245)
 
258 Age at Death: 64 Osborn, Charlotte Ruth (I5679)
 
259 Age at Death: 76 Seeley, Oliver (I1720)
 
260 Age at Death: 82 Karstadt, Edna Harriett (I2167)
 
261 Age at Death: 85 Osborne, Percy (I531)
 
262 Age at Death: 86 Sever, Agnes Helen (I7018)
 
263 Age at Death: 87 Grefe, Robert G (I234)
 
264 age from 1870 census in error Brown, Norman W (I4330)
 
265 age on death record Heath, John (I3695)
 
266 Age: 0 Gordon, Richard Martin (I7097)
 
267 Age: 1 Phelps, Nephi A (I7563)
 
268 Age: 20 Hayden, Mary (I5898)
 
269 Age: 24 Sibley, Lillian (I6238)
 
270 Age: 26 Shultz, James (I5112)
 
271 Age: 31 Osborne, Margaret Helen (I527)
 
272 Age: 37 Hayden, William (I5896)
 
273 Age: 40 Gordon, Edna Sarah (I225)
 
274 Age: 41 DeGroat, Anna M (I7069)
 
275 Age: 46 Gaylord, Sabra (I5841)
 
276 Age: 54 Davenport, Ralph Bridgeman (I7569)
 
277 Age: 56 Bowyer, Frederick Lee (I2128)
 
278 Age: 57 DeGroat, Henry Clinton (I7083)
 
279 Age: 58 Gibbons, Alfred (I7167)
 
280 Age: 60 Phelps, Benjamin (I565)
 
281 Age: 60 Goodyear, Donald (I6833)
 
282 Age: 61 Koepler {Koessler?}, Sarah (I4132)
 
283 Age: 61 Stone, Samuel (I6151)
 
284 Age: 61 Stone, Samuel (I6151)
 
285 Age: 64 Gordon, Mildred Ethel (I220)
 
286 Age: 64 Schultz, Jesse Z (I1933)
 
287 Age: 64 Osborn, Charlotte Ruth (I5679)
 
288 Age: 64 Hayden, Samuel (I5897)
 
289 Age: 65 Phelps, Donald Ellis (I7257)
 
290 Age: 66 Shultz, John (I5235)
 
291 Age: 66 Shultz, John (I5235)
 
292 Age: 67 Felker, Edward (I6936)
 
293 Age: 68 Gordon, Capitola E (I203)
 
294 Age: 68 Johann, Johann Nicolaus (I6887)
 
295 Age: 69 Hayden, William (I5839)
 
296 Age: 69 Cassleman, Harry Richeson (I6319)
 
297 Age: 70 Garza, Manuela (I6630)
 
298 Age: 71 Fritz, Elizabeth (I193)
 
299 Age: 71 Fritz, Elizabeth (I193)
 
300 Age: 71 Gibbons, Robert (I7137)
 
301 Age: 71 Phelps, Ollie R (I7357)
 
302 Age: 72 Gulick, Glenn Albert (I7337)
 
303 Age: 74 Moore, Deacon John (I5875)
 
304 Age: 74 Furler, Eli (I6912)
 
305 Age: 76 Phelps, Mr Arthur Lee (I2352)
 
306 Age: 76 Heinrich, Ross (I3920)
 
307 Age: 76 Baum, Anna Margaretha (I6137)
 
308 Age: 76 Gibbons, Charles (I7143)
 
309 Age: 76 Gibbons, Charles (I7143)
 
310 Age: 77 Long, Orpha Dorthy (I7265)
 
311 Age: 78 Gordon, Sarah Jane (I224)
 
312 Age: 78 Harris, Francis (I4231)
 
313 Age: 78 Campbell, Samuel A (I6653)
 
314 Age: 79 Campbell, William A (I3501)
 
315 Age: 79 Macdonald, John Sanfield (I6940)
 
316 Age: 79 Völckel Felker, Ludwig "Lewis" (I6948)
 
317 Age: 82 Shawl, Daniel H (I1381)
 
318 Age: 83 Shultz, Daniel (I5094)
 
319 Age: 83 Shultz, Daniel (I5094)
 
320 Age: 83 Furler, William Henry (I6917)
 
321 Age: 83 Gibbons, Daniel (I7135)
 
322 Age: 84 DeGroat, Catherine (I7110)
 
323 Age: 84 Lung, August Jr. (I7208)
 
324 Age: 85 Osborne, Percy (I531)
 
325 Age: 85 Osborn, Israel (I5819)
 
326 Age: 85 Phelps, Levi (I7172)
 
327 Age: 86 Debats, Phyllis Marta (I2171)
 
328 Age: 86 Hardy, Matilda (I7062)
 
329 Age: 88; CauseOfDeath: Old Age Mills, Jesse (I7370)
 
330 Age: 90 Bowen, Joseph Gordon (I7108)
 
331 Age: 91 Johannes, Helen M (I1354)
 
332 Age: 92 Osborn, Israel Hayden (I5822)
 
333 Age: 93 Hayden, Daniel (I5892)
 
334 also appears on 1900 census with horatio campbell as grace campbell b apr 1892--on same census twice!!!! once on 6/26 and once on 6/18 both in fairhaven, huron Taylor, Grace (I900)
 
335 Also refered to as Sarah Smith instead of her Indian name Saunders, Thomas A (I4607)
 
336 American Porter, William Sydney (I4378)
 
337 American Civil War Soldiers
about Uriah Irish
Name: Uriah Irish ,
Residence: Brandon, Michigan
Enlistment Date: 10 Feb 1864
Enlistment Place: Brandon, Michigan
Side Served: Union
State Served: Michigan
Death Date: 18 Jul 1901
Service Record: Enlisted as a Private on 10 February 1864 at the age of 44.
Enlisted in Company D, 22nd Infantry Regiment Michigan on 10 Feb 1864.
Transferred out of Company D, 22nd Infantry Regiment Michigan on 26 Jun 1865.
Transferred into Company D, 29th Infantry Regiment Michigan on 26 Jun 1865.
Mustered Out Company D, 29th Infantry Regiment Michigan on 6 Sep 1865 at Murfreesboro, TN.

Sources: 10

Source Citation: Side served: Union; State served: Michigan; Enlistment date: 10 Feb 1864..
 
Irish, Uriah S (I388)
 
338 Among the glories of the old Bay State are truly numbered the Berkshire hills. Lying along the western border of the State, they form a boundary between it and the Empire State, as magnificent as it is marked. Italy, under her sunny skies and beside her blue waters, hath no more beautiful scenery than the Berkshire hills reveal when clothed in the beautiful garments of June, or arrayed in the gorgeous raiment of the Indian summer. Even amid the bleak, howling winds of winter, when the feathery flakes are driven furiously down the gorges of the mountains, or lie piled upon the numerous spurs that lie along the main ridge; even then there is a grandeur that looms up from the white-robed clearings, set in the dark surroundings of the hemlock and pine forests that still crown their summits, though one hundred years have passed since the axe of the settler first resounded through their dim recesses.
Amid these surroundings, in the beginning of the last year of the eighteenth century (January 16, 1799), Elnathan Phelps, the subject of our sketch, was born in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. He was one of ten children-four boys and six daughters born to Benjamin and Sally Phelps. He was familiar with the hardships and privations of a farmer's life among the hills, where, in those days, the greatest luxury, almost, the larder afforded was a pie, with one crust of rye and one of wheat flour, and that provided only on a Sunday; and he therefore determined to go where the country, though less beautiful, was more productive.
When he was twenty years, he gave his father one hundred dollars for his time, and went on foot to western New York, where he worked for a time, getting together thereby some money, when he returned to Pittsfield, where, in 1826, he married Clarissa Colt, who bore him two children, --Edwin and Helen (twins). His wife dying October 21, 1832, he was left alone with his two children, and in the spring of 1833 he removed to Michigan, where he settled on the farm now owned and occupied by his son, Edwin Phelps, in the township of Pontiac.
In 1837 he was united in marriage to Elizabeth Smith, who died in 1842, and Helen, his daughter, then fourteen years of age, took charge of the household. In 1852 he brought another companion to cheer his loneliness, Jane Butler, who survives him. About that time he sold his old homestead, reserving but a small portion, on which he erected a new house, near the old one, in which he resided until his death, which occurred December 2, 1870.
He was a member of the Congregational church, which he united with soon after he came to the county. He afterwards united with the Presbyterian society, and after his last marriage attended the Baptist church. He lived a consistent Christian life, avoiding the law; and having no political ambition, he secured the respect of all who knew him, and was blessed with the affection of his family and love of his friends. He survived all of his father's family save one, his brother, Alfred Phelps, who now resides in Troy, Michigan, who, at the ripe age of seventy-seven years. sheds a genial atmosphere on all who approach him. The old homestead is a lasting monument to its founder, in its elegant improvements and beautiful trees which adorn its spacious area.

Maple Place, Pontiac Twp, Oakland Co. Mich.
Another site of interest is the familiar Phelps home at 1370 Doris Road, The property was named "Maple Place" by its primary resident, Edwin Phelps, who made use of the many maples surrounding the homestead each spring when the sap ran.
The original 160 acre parcel was purchased in 1833 by Elnathan Phelps. Tax and tract records indicate the purchase was made from Jerome Galloway, whose brother, Alexander, probably originally purchased the parcel in 1821 from the government.
The Galloways were early settlers in this area (1819-21) and purchased heavily throughuot the county. A spring-fed lake included in the quarter-section purchase bears the name Galloway.
Elnathan Phelps, son of Sarah (Smellage) and Benjamin Phelps, was born in 1799 in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. Prior to his move to Oakland County, his primary concern was woolen manufacturing, but his interest turned to agriculture once he settled here. In 1826, he married Clarissa Colt. They had two children, twins Edwin and Helen (Reeves).
Elnathan died on December 2, 1870. Prior to his death, he sold what appears to be nearly all his land to his son.
Biographical sketches for Oakland County for 1877, 1891 and 1903 include Edwin Phelps among the areas's prominent residents. An 1891 reference suggests Edwin Phelps had "furnished his dwelling with substantial and tasteful appointments, and made many arrangements for the comfort of his family."
Beginning in 1868, Edwin Phelps Jr. acquired the land. He apparently sold the homestead to W. Smith, possibly Walter Smith, his sister, Claras's husband. Walter Smith (and others) sold off various portions of the original homestead, including the later purchase of Elnathan Phelps, until the 1.51 acre parcel was defined as it stands today. P. Smith, listed for the last time in 1966, may be the last direct family member to own this particular parcel.
Taken from: Pontiac Township- End of an Era; book at Auburn Hills Library, AH, Michigan.
 
Phelps, Elnathan (I579)
 
339 An excellent biographical and genealogical treatment can be found in the book 'Alla Lizzie' by Helen Eichstatedt of Johann Georg Maser, Elizabeth Catherine Debus, their children and grandchildren. Debus, Elisabeth Catharina (I2670)
 
340 An excellent biographical and genealogical treatment can be found in the book 'Alla Lizzie' by Helen Eichstatedt of Johann Georg Maser, Elizabeth Catherine Debus, their children and grandchildren. Maser, Johann Georg (I3042)
 
341 An Ojibwa (Chippewa) Indian. She was adopted by the Smith family after her parents died in a small pox epidemic in Arenac County. Went by Sarah Smith, then went by Sarah Saunders after married to Thomas Saunders.

Grave stone reads Sarah Saunders, 1863-1941 Great Grandmother, Otush Quay Ob No Qua 
Otush Quay Ob No Qua (I4613)
 
342 An on-line depository. http://search.labs.familysearch.org/recordsearch/start.html#c=1452395;p=2;t=searchable Source (S205)
 
343 An on-line resource located at http://www.ortsfamilienbuecher.de/wersau/?lang=de Source (S452)
 
344 An online searchable database Source (S485)
 
345 An unsourced IGI record reportedly shows a marriage date of 25 Jun 1616 in Arden, Warwick, England between John Drake and Lettice Shakespeare (Note: a reputed relative of William Shakespeare).As a possible confirmation of this, a record dated 25 Jun1615 has been found. The handwriting is very hard to read. It seems to say "John Drake & Lettes Srhaxper were married 25th day of June 1615" See attached marriage record.

Death record 6 Dec 1623 in Bradford, West Yorkshire "the wife of John Drake of London" would not seem to be the correct person, based on location. Although this is offered as the death record in certain online trees.
 
Shakespeare, Lettice (I6199)
 
346 ancestry.com transcription has 03 Jan 1824. However a closer look shows that a 2 was written over the 4, making it difficult to read. Moore, Prudence (I6984)
 
347 Andrew Shultz's will date 1/14/1873 leaves real estate to his daughter Hannah Lucia Shultz, "his only child". He appoints his "friend" John M Cole as executor of the estate and as guardian for Hannah. He died 4 days later. Tuscola probate file 491(begins image 962). Lucia's parents are also mentioned Leonard Sweat and Eliza Helen Humphrey. Shultz, Hannah Lucia (I810)
 
348 ANN ELIZA (OSBORNE) UNKNOWN

BIRTH:
Abt 1827 in Kings, New York -per census records 1865, 1870, 1875.

PARENTS:
Unknown.
Father’s name may be McPherson. See reasoning below).

MARRIAGE:
William E Osborne.
Marriage date by 1855 for birth of William and certainly by 1859 (based on William E and Ann E signing off on a real estate deed in connection with his father’s estate). Her maiden name may be McPherson. Her son in law, Cornelius Melvin, listed Eliza McPherson as his first wife (who passed away) on a naval pension document. On a different document he listed his first wife as Lida Osborn. Perhaps Eliza was Lida’s correct name. Perhaps Mcpherson was her mother’s name at this time Lida was born. Which could indicate that Ann Eliza already had Lida before she married William E. (according to the New York State Census Ann Eliza was on her first marriage and William his second.) Also, on the 1865 New York State Census, a sister Emeline Mcfeeson (McPherson??) is living in the Osborne household. Emeline being 39 years younger than William and 14 years younger than Ann Eliza was probably the sister of Ann Eliza, not William.

Note about Cornelius Melvin: He seems to be loose with the names. He served two enlistments in the Navy as Cornelius H Melvin and two enlistments as Cornelius Higgins. His given reason, was because his mother did not want him to go back in, he signed up under a different name. We suspect it may be because he had a criminal record. He states that Higgens was his mother’s maiden name. But on all of the marriage records we have, he does not give a mother’s maiden name of Higgens!

CENSUS RECORDS:
We cannot identify Ann Eliza in any census record prior to 1865.

1865 New York State Census. We find Ann Eliza Osburn in Brooklyn, Kings, New York.
Wm Osborn 64 laborer b. Canada?
Ann E 39 wife b. Kings
Lida 21 child b. (can’t read occupation) Kings
Wm 10 child b. Kings
Emeline McFeeson? 25 sister b. Kings

1870 Federal Census. We find Ann Eliza Osburn in Rochester, Monroe, New York.
William 68 gasburner salesman b. Conn.
Ann E 43 wife b. New York
William 15 at school b. New York
Cornelius Melvin 34 Lumber sorter b. New York
Lida Melvin 27 boarding b. New York
Edgar Melvin 2 b. New York

1875 New York State Census. We find Ann Eliza Osburn in Rochester, Monroe, New York.
ward 7, page 100
896 frame house value $3000 #919
Name/age/sex/relation to head of household/State or County of birth/married or sgl/occupation/voter/owner of land
William Osburn/72/male/head/Connecticut/married/gas fitter/voter/owner of land
Anna Osburn/48/female/wife/New York/married
Charles Melvin/40/male/son-in-law/New York/married/Bookkeeper
Leidda Melvin/34/female/wife/New York/married
William H Osburn/20/male/son/Monroe/single/clerk in d.g. store
Edgar Melvin/7/male/grandson/Monroe
(Y?)dda Melvin/2/female/granddaughter/Monroe

We cannot identify Ann Eliza in any census record after 1875.

REAL ESTATE:
We have found no real estate transactions in the name of Wm E Osborn or his wife Ann Eliza, but she does appear in connection with the settlement of the estate of her husband’s father.
Deed filed 5 Sep 1859 in Monroe County, New York liber 172 p 118 in connection with the estate of Israel osborn, lists the following as his heirs at law:
William E Osborn and wife Ann Eliza Osborn
Nathaniel W Osborn and his wife Roxy S Osborn
John A McGonegal and wife the former Ursula Osborn
Franklin Leggett and wife Susan M Leggett (He is son of the deceased Mary Osborn)
Charles I Osborn

NEWSPAPERS:
Obituary for her daughter Lida.
The Rochester Union Advertiser 4 May 1878
In this city, Friday afternoon, May ??, 18??(very fuzzy), Lida C Melvin, wife of Cornelius H Melvin, and daughter of William E and Ann Eliza Osborne, aged 34 years, 7 months and ? days.

DEATH:
Unknown

BURIAL:
Unknown

CHILDREN:
Lida b. 1843 may have been the child of Ann Eliza before she married William E Osborne.
William b. 1855 was probably the child of William E (in particular the middle name of Hayden would seem to indicate he was named by Israel Osborn, after Israel’s mother Anna Hayden) and Lida.
The 1865 census listed that Ann Eliza who was on her first marriage had 4 children. Considering the 25 year age difference between William E and Ann E, the 4 children may have been William’s children or a combination of William’s and Ann’s children.
It is therefore a possibility that William had two or three children that we do not know about.
The theory that William H and Lida have different biological parents helps us make sense of the marriage of William H’s daughter (Lillian) to Lida’s son (Edgar). A first cousin marriage does not seem correct of people not living in a rural and/or isolated area. Also, the 25 year age difference makes it less likely that a 40 year old William married a 15 year old, which would be necessary for Lida to be his daughter.
 
Osborne, Lida C (I1817)
 
349 ANN UNKNOWN GREENSLADE PUDEATER

Nothing is known of Ann's parentage, birthplace or birthdate. It is assumed that she was born about 1617-1622 based upon her age of 70-75 at death in 1692. It would also be assumed that she was born in England as emigration did not begin to the Maine area until well after her presumed birthdate. Her maiden name is unknown. We can find references in Maine for her first husband and some of her children, but she is not mentioned. It is assumed that she was in Maine with her first husband and her children. In 1673 references for her husband and children began showing up in Salem, Massachusetts.

The first reference using Ann's name was 1677 in Salem:
Thomas Greenslett, dying intestate, court granted administration upon his estate to Ann Greenslett, who was to pay the debts as far as the inventory, which was 3 li, 16s, sd., would allow.

In 1677 or later she remarried Jacob Pudeater:
From Torreys "New England Marriages":
Greenslad, Thomas (-1674) & Ann _____ (-1692), m/2 Jacob PUDEATOR/PUDEATER 1677+; by 1652; Falmouth, ME/Scarborough, ME {Salem 2:398, 3:64; Averill 1:112; Sv. 2:310; GDMNH 289; Porter 25; EIHC 3:228, 4:37}

An inquiry by the Salem Quarterly Court in 1680 contains the following testimony regarding the death of Jacob Pudeator's first wife:
John Barton(sig) Chirurgeon of Salem, testified that "being called to ye house of Jacob Pudeator for to visett his former wife I found her upon ye bed in a sencelesse stupifyed condition not able to spake one word, felt of her hands & she was extream cold, with little or noe pulse. After Enquiry how she came into that condition ye said Pudeater with ye widow Greenslet did answer that she had been a broad adrinking of Rum & being a very slibery cold time, she fell downe & not being able to rise againe lay in ye said place some considerable time till somebody found her & brought her into ye house and after administration of several Medicines, in some few days she was recovered, & sat up in a chair by the fire, haueing some competency of sence & reason, then there being Mr. John Browne, Sr. admonishing her, she seemed to be troubled for her fault & promised amendment. I ye said Barton chargeing & requiring ye said Pudeator & ye nurss Greenslet not to giue her any rum or other strong Drinkes for they answered they shall not need to doe itt, for she would haue itt if it was to be had, for their backs could not be turned, but she would out of doors & carry anything with her to pawne for Rum, & as her husband said she had made away with most of ye necessaryes of ye house for Rum, soe I left her by ye fireside in a hopefull way of recouervy, & in a short time after I heard she was dead, much to my amazement." Sworn, May 31, 1680, before Bartho. Gidney(sig), commissioner.
Ann Pudeator testified that the night her husband's first wife died she was in the same room and saw Pudeator give his wife Rum in a porringer, as she sat in her chair, three several times, and, about a half an hour after, they saw that she was dead. Sworn, Apr 26, 1680, before Wm. Hathorne(sig), assistant.
Humphrey Case, aged about fifty years, testified that the night before she died he heard her ask for a dram, whereupon he gave her a white earthen porringer full of brandy. She drank part of it and he urged her to drink it all, but she said she would bye and bye. The porringer was as full each time as it could be conveniently handed one from another. Sworn, Apr 27, 1680, before Bartho Gedney(sig), commissioner.
Symon Booth, aged about thirty-nine years, and Recha Booth, aged about thirty-nine years, deposed that about two and three-quarters years ago they lived in Salem in a house of Jacob Pudeater's and Isabell, wife of said Jacob, on the afternoon before she died, about three of four o'clock, came to their house and smoked a pipe of tobacco. She talked rationally and seemed in reasonable good health. At about eight or nine o'clock they heard she was dead, and Symon testified that, at eleven or twelve o'clock, he saw her stretched out dead upon a board or table in Pudeator's house.

In 1682 Jacob Pudeator died.
Will of Jackob (his mark) Pudetor, proved 28:9:1682:"Imprimis. After my Debts And Funeral Expences Dyscharged that the Remayner of the Whole Estate both housing Land & Goods shall Be for ye use of my wife An Pudetor During her Naturall Life. Secondly: my will is that If It plese god to tak me out of the work By this Sickness then the five pound that John Grenslitt oeth me the Next year shall Be frely for Given him. Thirdly. My will is that the other fore of my wifes Children that is to saye Thomas Grenslitt & Ruth & Samuel & James Grenslit shall haue Each of them five pounds A peece out of the Estate After My wiues Desece. Forthly. My will is that after My wiues Desece & the formar Legesyespayd the Remayner of my Estate shall fall to Isec Pudetor my Cosen and After his Decece to the Next that is Nerest of my Relation & soe from one Jeneration to Another. Further My will is that My Loving wife An Pudetor shall Be My Sole Exececetris & haue desired my Louing frends Cosen Mr. John Browne Sr., Mr Francis Scerry & John Massey to be the Ouarsesears of this my will & that they shall be satisfied for Any Extraordenary Paynes." Wit: John Browne(Sig) and Francis Skerry(sig)

In 1692 Ann Pudeater was charged with sorcery and witchcraft:
Transcriptions of arrest warrants and trial testimony is listed under "misc notes" below.

On 22 Sep 1692 Ann Pudeater was executed by hanging at Gallows Hill, Salem, Massachusetts. The disposition of her body is unknown. A stone commemorating her was engraved and placed at the witches' memorial in Salem, Massachusetts along with stones honoring the other executed victims of the witchcraft paranoia in Salem.

MISC NOTES

http://etext.virginia.edu/salem/witchcraft/Essex/ On-line references to the quarterly court of Salem.

TRIAL TRANSCRIPTS

The Salem Witchcraft Papers, Volume 3 : Verbatim Transcripts of the Legal Documents of the Salem Witchcraft Outbreak of 1692 / edited and with an Introduction and Notes by Paul Boyer and Stephen Nissenbaum
Electronic Text Center, University of Virginia Library
________________________________________
" Case 1 Ann Pudeator Executed, September 22, 1692 (See also: George Jacobs, Sr. -- Mittimus.)
o Warrant (Warrant for Arrest of Ann Pudeater and Alice Parker)
o Section (Sarah Churchill v. Ann Pudeator, Bridget Bishop, and George Jacobs, Sr.)
o Examination (Examination of Ann Pudeator)
o Summons (Summons for Witnesses v. Ann Pudeator and Alice Parker)
o Indictment (Indictment v. Ann Pudeator)
o Section (Sarah Churchill v. Ann Pudeator)
o Section (Mary Warren v. Ann Pudeator)
o Section (Elizabeth Hubbard v. Ann Pudeator)
o Section (Ann Putnam, Jr. v. Ann Pudeator)
o Section (Sarah Bibber v. Ann Pudeator)
o Section (Mary Walcott v. Ann Pudeator)
o Section (Samuel Pickworth v. Ann Pudeator)
o Section (Ann Putnam, Jr. v. Ann Pudeator)
o Section (John Best, Sr. v. Ann Pudeator)
o Section (John Best, Jr. v. Ann Pudeator)
o Section (Petition of Ann Pudeator)
Ann Pudeator Executed, September 22, 1692 (See also: George Jacobs, Sr. -- Mittimus.)
(Warrant for Arrest of Ann Pudeater and Alice Parker)
To: To the Marshall of Essex or Constable
in Salem
You are in theire Majes'ts names hereby required forthwith to apprehend and bring before us Alice parker the wife of John parker of Salem and Ann pudeator of Salem Widdow who stand Charged with sundry acts of Witchcraft by them Committed this day Contrary to the Laws of our Sov'r Lord & Lady. faile not Dated Salem. May the. 12'th 1692

us *John Hathorne [unclear: ] Assists
*Jonathan. Corwin
May 12'th -- 1692 I have apprehended the a bove named persons and Brought them att the place apointed by your honors

r mee *George Herrick Marshall of Essex
(Reverse) copyed

(Sarah Churchill v. Ann Pudeator, Bridget Bishop, and George Jacobs, Sr.)
Sarah Churchwell confesseth that Goody pudeater brought the book to this Examin't and she signed it, but did not know her at that tyme but when she saw her she knew her to be the same and that Goody Bishop
Olliver appeared to this Examinant & told her she had killed John Trask's Child, (whose Child dyed about that tyme) & said Bishop
Olliver afflicted her as alsoe did old George Jacobs, and before that time this Examin't being afflicted could not doe her service as formerly and her s'd Master Jacobs called her bitch witch & ill names & then afflicted her as #[before] above and that pudEater brought 3: Images like Mercy Lewis, Ann putnam, Eliza' Hubbard & they brought her thornes & she stuck them in the Images & told her the persons whose likeness they were, would be afflicted & the other day saw Goody Olliver [fitt] sate upon her kneee,

Jurat in Curia
by Sarah Churchill

This Confession was taken before John Hathorne and Jonathan Corwin Esq'rs 1'0 Jun
y 1692, as attests

*Tho Newton

(Examination of Ann Pudeator)
An Puddeater: examined before the Majestrates of Salem July 2: 92 Sarah Churchwell: was bid to: say what she: had to say of her: You have charged her with bringing the book to you:
A Yes said: Churchwell
have you seen her since. A no:
goodwife puddeater: you have: formerly: bin complaynd of: we now further enquire: here is one person: saith you brought her: the book Sarah Churchell: look on the person: ses Churchill: you did bring me the book: I was at Goodman Jacobses
Puddeater s'd I never saw the Woman before now::it was told puddeater this mayd charged you with: bringing her: the book: at the last examinat'n Puddeater s'd I never saw: the Devils book nor knew that he had one Lt Jer: Neal: was asked what he could say of this woman Neal s'd she had been an ill carriaged woman: & since my wife has bin sick of the small pox: this woman has come to my house pretending kindnes: and I was glad to see it: she asked: whether she might use our morter: which was used: for my wife: and I consented to it: but I afterward repented of it: for the nurs told. me my wife was the wors: for senc she was very ill of a flux: which she had not before
When the officer came: for puddeater: the nurs s'd you are come to late for my wife grew wors till she dyed: s'd Pudeater had often threatned my wife:
Eliz Hubard: s'd she: had seen s'd Pudeater [] s'd Mary Wolcot: but she had not hurt her she had seen her with goodwife Nurs
goody puddeater what did you doe with the ointments that you had in the hous so many of them:she s'd I never had ointment nor oyl but neats foot oyl in my hous since my husband dyed: but the Constable Joseph Neal affirmd she had: she had near 20 that had oynment or greas: in them: a little in a thing: she s'd she never had any oyntment but neats foot oyl: in the hous but what was in these things the Constable speakes of.
A. It was greas: to make sope of::but: why: did you put them in so many things when one would have held all: but answerd not the porpose: but the constabl. s'd oyntments were of several sorts
Sarah Vibber did you ever se this woman: before now answered no An putn[u]m s'd she had never seen: her but since she come: to Salem Town last: s'd Putman fell into a fitt: & s'd Puddeater was commanded to take her by the wrist & did & s'd Putnum was well presently: many warin fell into: two fitts quickly after. one another: & both times was helped: by s'd Puddeaters: taking her by the wrist

(Summons for Witnesses v. Ann Pudeator and Alice Parker)
Wm & Mary by the Grace of God of England Scotland France & Ireland King & Queen defend' s &c.
To the Sheriff of Essex or deputy Greeting

We Co
nd you to Warn John Wesgate John Bullock Martha Dutch Susanna Dutch Lt. Jeremiah Neale John Beckett John Best Jun'r Jno Loader Sarah parott
That they & Every of them appear at the Next Court of Oyer & Terminer holden at Salem on the Next Tuesday at Twelve of the Clock There to Testify the Truth to the best of thier knowledge On certain Indictments to be Exhibited against Alice Parker & Ann Pudeater hereof Make return fail not dated in Salem Sep'r 5'th 1692 in the fourth yeare of Our Reign.
*Stephen Sewall Cle
(Reverse)
Sept 5'th 1692 I have Sumoned and have Warned all the within named persons John Best Jun'r Except s'd Best beeing Removed to Ipswich that thay and Every of them appeare to Give in their Evid: &c: att time and place within written

'r me *George Herrick Dep't Sheriff

(Indictment v. Ann Pudeator)
Essex in the Province of [unclear: ] the Massachussetts Bay In New England ss
Annoq'e R R's & Reginae Gulielmi & Mariae Angliae &c Quarto Annoq'e Do
1692 //
The Juriors for our Sov'r Lord and Lady the King & Queen
sent That Ann Pudeator of Salem in the County of Essex #[Widow] aforesaid Widdow The second day of July in the Yeare Aforesaid and divers others days and times as well before as after Certaine detestable Arts called Witchcraft & Sorceries Wickedly Mallitiously and felloniously hath used practised and Exercised At and within the Township of Salem aforesaid in & upon & against one Mary Warren of Salem aforesaid Single Woeman, by which said Wicked Acts the said Mary Warren the second day of July aforesaid and divers other days and times both before and after was and is Tortured Afflicted Pined Consumed Wasted & Tormented, and also for sundry other Acts of Witchcraft by the said Ann Pudeater Comitted and done before and Since that time Ags't the peace of Our Sov'r Lord & Lady the King & Queen theire Crowne and Dignity and ags't the forme of the Stattute in that Case made and Provided
Witnesses
Mary Warren Jurat
Sarah Churchel Jurat
Ann Putman Jurat
(Reverse)
Ann Pudeator on Mary Warren
(Sarah Churchill v. Ann Pudeator)
Sarah Churchel: affirmd: to: the Jury of inquest: that Ann Puddeatee: has: greatly afflicted her s'd Churchel by: choaking her pinching her & sticking pinse into her: & by pressing of her: &: making her sett her hand to: the book upon: the oath she hath: taken Sept: 6: 1692
Sworn in Court.
& brought poppets to her to stick pins to w'ch she did & the
'sons aflicted by it
(Mary Warren v. Ann Pudeator)
Mary Warin upon her oath: that she hath taken affirms: to the Jury of inquest that Ann Puddeater hath often: afflicted me: by biting me pinching me sticking pins in me: & choaking me: and particularly on the 2 day of July: att her examination: s'd Puddeater did: afflict me greatly: also she or her Apperition did offer: me the book to sign to: she told me also that she was the caus of Jno Turners falling off: the cherry tree: to his great: hurt: & which: amazed him in his head & almost kild him: she told me also: she was the caus of: Jeremiah Neals wifes death: & I saw her hurt: Eliz Hubbard: Mary Walcot: & An Putnam: the last night she: afflicted: me also: last night: by her wichcrafts & I doe veryly: beleev: s'd Ann Puddeater is a: wich: she affirms puddeater: told her: she kild har husband Puddeater: & his first wife and that she was an instrument of Jno Bests: wifes death: Sept 7: 1692 Sworne in Court
(Elizabeth Hubbard v. Ann Pudeator)
Eliz Hubberd affirmd: upon: the oath she hath taken thatt: she hath seen: Ann: Puddeate: Afflict Mary: Warin: & that she or her Apperition did hurt me and Mary Warin the last night before. the Jury of inquest: Sep'r: 7: 1692 & that she hath aflicted her since she came into Court

Jurat in Curia.

(Ann Putnam, Jr. v. Ann Pudeator)
An Putnam affirmed: upon: her oath: to: the Jury of inquest: that: she: hath seen Ann Puddeater: afflict Mary Warin: Mary Walcot: & Eliz Hubbard: often: and perticulerly: att the time: of her: last examination: before the Majestrates: at Mr Tho. Beadles: she also: hath afflicted me: both then and at other times: Sept'r 7: 1692
Owned her Evidence in Court

(Sarah Bibber v. Ann Pudeator)
Sarah Vibber: upon: her: oath affirmed to the Jury of inquest that shee: hath seen: An Puddeater afflict: Mary Warin: Mary Walcot & An Putnam: both at the time of her examination at Mr Tho Beadles; and the last night she: together with goodwife Parker. did afflict: the forenamed: Warin Walcot & Putnum: s'd Puddeater: hath afflicted: me: to: and i do beleeve she is a wich Sep'r 7: 1692
(Mary Walcott v. Ann Pudeator)
Mary Walcot: upon oath affirmd to the Jury of inquest: that: she hath seen An Puddeater: afflict Mary: Warin: An Putnam: & Eliz Hubbard: at the time of her examination: at Mr Tho Beadles: and also the last night: I saw: her: afflict Mary Warin #[Mercy Lewis] An Putman & Eliz Hubbard: by wichcraft: & I verily beleev: s'd Pudeater: is a witch September: 7: 92. & that this day she hath afflicted this deponent.
Jurat in Curia Sep'r 10. 92. Attest *S Sewall
I find: by: my Characters: which I took: at the examination of An Puddeater that it was on the 2 day of July: that she was examined: at mr Tho Beadles thay bearing: date so:

Septr 7: 1692
*Simon Willard:

(Reverse) Several Witnesses against An Pudeator

(Samuel Pickworth v. Ann Pudeator)
The testimony of Samuall Pikworth Whou testifieth that a bout six weckes agoo: I this deponant was coming along salim strete
tween ann pudeaters hous and Captin higison hous. it being in the evening: and I this deponant saw awoman: neare Captin higisonn Cornar. the which I sopposed to be ann Pudeatar. and in a moment of time she pasid by me as swifte as if a burd flue by me and I saw said woman goo in to ann Pudeat [eat] ers hous

Jurat in Curia
*S Sewall Cl

Sam'll Pickworth: affirmeth: that the above written evidence is the truth: upon oath: to: the Jury of Inquest: Sept'r 7: 92

(Ann Putnam, Jr. v. Ann Pudeator)
(Reverse)
September the 7. 92 ann Putnam afarmid to the grand Inquest that ann pudeatar: tould har that she flu by aman in the neight in to a hous
(Reverse) Sam Pickworth
(John Best, Sr. v. Ann Pudeator)
The testimony of Jno Best Senior aged about 48 years Testifieth & saith that some years Last past that I this Deponat did often hear my wife saye that Ann pudeater would not Lett her alone untill she had killd her By her often pinching & Bruseing of her Till her Earms & other parts of her Body Looked Black by Reson of her soer pinching of her in the Tyme of her sickness of my wife did affarm that itt was an pudeater that afflict her & stood in the Belefe of itt as Long as she Lived.

Jurat in Curia
*S Sewall Cle

Sep'r 7'th 92
Jno Best: afirmed: to the truth of the above written: before the Jury of inquest. Sept'r 7: 1692

(Reverse) Jno Best Oath ags't An: Pudeator --

(John Best, Jr. v. Ann Pudeator)
The testimony of John best Junear hou testifieth uppon his oath before the grand Inquest that his Mother did severall tims in har siknis complain of ann pudeatar of salim the wife of Jacob pudeatar how she had beewiched har and that she did believe she would kill har before she had dun: and soo she said severall times duering hear siknis: until har death allso I this deponant: did severall times goo in to the woulds to fech my fathars Cowes: and I did drive goode pudeatars Cow back from. our Cowes: and I being all alone: ann pudeatar would Chide me when I Came houm: for turning the Cow bak: by Reson of which I this deponant did ConClude said pudeater was a wich

Jurat in Curia
(Reverse) John best Junior against pudeatar

(Petition of Ann Pudeator)
The humble Petition of Ann Poodeater unto the honoured Judge and Bench now Setting in Judicature in Salem humbly Sheweth:
That Wheras your Poor and humble Petitioner being condemned to die and knowing in my own conscience as I shall shortly answer it before the great God of heaven who is the searcher & knower of all hearts: That the Evidence of Jno Best Sen'r and Jno Best Jun'r and Sam'll Pickworth w'ch was given in against me in Court were all of them altogether false & untrue and besides the abovesaid Jno Best hath been formerly whipt and likewise is r
rded for a Lyar I would humbly begg of yo'r honours to Take it into your Judicious and Pious
consideration That my life may not be taken away by such false Evidence and wittnesses as these be likewise the Evidence given in against me by Sarah Church and Mary Warren I am altogether ignorant off and know nothing in the least measure about it nor nothing else concerning the crime of witchcraft for w'ch I am condemned to die as will be known to men and angells att the great day of Judgment begging and imploring your prayers att the throne of grace in my behalfe and your poor and humble petition'r shall for ever pray as she is bound in duty for your hon'rs health and happiness in this life and eternall felicity in the world to come
(Reverse)
Ann Pudeaters Peti
( Essex County Archives, Salem -- Witchcraft Vol. 1 Page 113 )
________________________________________

________________________________________

-711-

Ann Pudeator
Written By Rachel Walker
Salem Witch Trials in History and Literature
An Undergraduate Course, University of Virginia
Spring Semester 2001
When Ann was arrested on May 12th 1692, she was a twice-widowed woman of property in Salem Town. Although her testimony is well-documented in the transcripts of the Court of Oyer and Terminer, details of her origins before the trials of 1692 are largely unknown. Ann is thought to have been born in England sometime between 1622 and 1627. She married her first husband, Thomas Greenslit (also spelled Greenslade) and had five children with him sometime before 1677. Her name appears for the first time in the public record of Salem Town on the certificate of inventory for the his estate following his death in 1674.

The family had likely lived in Falmouth, Maine during the birth of Ann's children, Thomas, Ruth, John, James, and Samuel, between 1650 & 1660. Although the eventual whereabouts of each of her children remains almost as unknown as Ann's own activities, her eldest son Thomas Pudeator went on to play a central role in the trial of the Reverend George Burroughs. He testified to the man's extraordinary feat of strength in lifting a gun at arm's length with just one finger in the barrel. In Salem Story, historian Bernard Rosenthal suggests that this may have been a last-ditch effort by Thomas to save his own mother from execution by appearing to join sides with the witch-hunters.

Ann was left destitute after her first husband died in 1674, probably working in the paid profession of a midwife and nurse. Her name does not appear again until March of 1678, when she is recorded as the wife of her neighbor Jacob Pudeator, a man about 20 years her junior. This unusual circumstance was calls attention to the fact that Ann had served as nurse to Jacob's first wife Isabel during her illness, and married Jacob less than a year after Isabel's unexplained death between 1675-1676. Jacob, too, passed away in 1682, leaving monetary bequests to each of Ann's five children, as well as the remainder of his property to Ann herself. Afterwards, Ann occupied the rather precarious position of being a professional woman of property in a male-dominated society.

Historian Carol F. Karlsen suggests that Ann became a prime target for allegations of witchcraft after she scolded John Best, Jr. for returning her lost cow from his fold. Best claimed that "he did conclude said Pudeator was a witch" because she "would chide me when I came home from turning the cow back." In her book, The Devil in the Shape of a Woman, Karlsen argues that women such as Ann who dared to defy the Puritan gender standard of the unassertive and docile female put themselves at great risk to be singled out for punishment through witchcraft accusations. She also implies that Ann's occupation of midwife, regardless of whether she earned money (for this is not confirmed), may have threatened other male medical professionals in Salem Town, leading to accusations. Birth was a risky act and filled with apprehension in that time period, loss of life during the process was often blamed on the malignant forces of the devil at work through witchcraft.

Whatever the motivations for her accusers, a warrant for Ann Pudeator and another woman, Alice Parker, was written on May 12th 1692. Pudeator was brought to trial on July 2nd, 1692. Sarah Churchill was the first to accuse Ann of having tormented her, by appearing with the book of the devil and asking her to sign it. She also accused Ann of having presented her with several images of accusing girls that she proceeded to torture like voodoo dolls with thorns. Five more of the circle of accusing girls confirmed these accusations - both Mary Warren and Ann Putnam falling into fits during Pudeator's examination and then being cured by a touch of Ann's hand. In addition to these displays, Elizabeth Hubbard, Mary Walcott, and Sarah Bibber also presented testimony that Pudeator had afflicted them through pinching, pressing and choking. The constable Joseph Neal described his discovery of "curious containers of various ointments" suspected to have been associated with Ann's alleged witchcraft at her house upon her arrest, and asserted that she was an "ill-carriaged woman" whom he was convinced had adversely affected his wife in her service as midwife. During her examination Ann insisted that these jars were simply filled with Neat's Foot Oil. Incriminating evidence of Ann's relation to animal familiars was given by Samuel Pickworth, who related seeing a bird fly by one night as he walked upon Salem Street, and soon after noticing a woman coming out of Ann's home, presumably the same entity as the bird. Going even farther, Mary Warren said that Pudeator had caused John Turner to fall from a tree, and accused Ann of killing her husband Jacob, Jacob's first wife Isabel, as well as the wives of John Best and Joseph Neal.

Throughout the trials, Ann remained consistent but relatively unassertive in her declarations of innocence. She insisted that she did not know her accusers, nor anything of the art of witchcraft. In response to curiosity about the ointments, she simply explained they were containers of grease to make her soap. Although her testimony in itself was not particularly noteworthy, her petition to the court, written before her death, merits acknowledgement for its simple denunciation of her accusers. Bernard Rosenthal brings this to light in his book, Salem Story,, pointing out that Ann accused Mary Warren, Sarah Churchill, John Best, Sr. and Jr., and Samuel Pickworth of bearing false witness against her. Particularly of note was her scathing addition that John Best Jr. was a known liar: "the abovesaid Jno Best hath been formerly whipt and likewise is [recorded] for a Lyar". In retrospect, this charge cast considerable doubt upon the validity of John's accusations, as well as the credibility of any court that would admit the testimony of a publicly acknowledged liar.

Strangely enough, not one of Ann's children came to her defense during the trials. Widowed and abandoned by her remaining kinfolk, Ann Pudeator, at that time somewhere between 70 and 75 years old, was hanged upon Gallows Hill on Sept. 22nd 1692, in what would be the final set of executions resulting from the Salem Witch trials.

Bibliography

Boyer and Nissenbaum, eds. "Pudeator, Ann." in The Salem Witchcraft Papers. 1977.

Karlsen, Carol. The Devil in the Shape of a Woman. [1998], 1987.

Piper, Deborah. "Re: [Salem Witch-L] Ann Greenslet Pudeator." 26 Apr. 2000. Salem Witch Descendents ListServe

Rosenthal, Bernard. Salem Story, 1993
 
Unknown, Ann Greenslade Pudeater (I4690)
 
350 Anna Katharina shows on the 1834 census. It would appear she is the mother of the first 4 children. The last child born in 1850 could be the child of Anna Katharina or Amma Margaretha Minde.
There is a Mindt (Georg HH88) household in Schilling on the 1798 census, perhaps that is her correct surname. Her husband was also from Schilling. 
Unknown, Anna Katharina (I5124)
 
351 Anne DOVER - d. Aug. 30, 1689, Windsor, CT - recorded as "Mrs. An Phelps died." A passenger on the 'Mary & John,' and first on the list of women members of the church at Dorchester.
 
Dover, Anne (I143)
 
352 apparently died young Irish, Albert (I3563)
 
353 Apparently had no children. Phelps, Marilla (I7175)
 
354 Apparently never married. Died without issue. Burrows, Samuel (I6673)
 
355 Apparently not living in 1846 when her brother James, who had no children, had his property probated to all of his brothers and sisters. Caruthers, Jean (I4759)
 
356 Apparently not related to the Maryland Thomas Browning of same approx age. Causes lots of confusion online. No solid info on parents. Was he born in Va. or did he emigrate?

Probate Record for Thomas Browning in Westmoreland, Virginia
Name:
Thomas Browning
Description:
Decedent
Date:
31 Jan 1726
Notes:
Browning, Thomas, 31 Jan. 1726; 22 Feb. 1726. Daughter Jane wife of Andrew Hutchinson land; daughter Ann widow of Morgan Williams 1 slave; daughter Mary wife of Richard Omohundro 1 slave; residue of estate to be equally divided among my children.
Prove Date:
22 Feb 1726
 
Browning, Thomas (I6491)
 
357 appears as jane on 1851 canada east census---could it be sarah jane?? Gordon, Sarah Jane (I224)
 
358 Appears in 1840 census living next to Hiram Maxfield in Groveland Twp. Varnis & Hiram appear in legal notice in 1837 New York Newspaper, as "residents of Michigan". There ages, both born in New Hampshire, both moving from New York to Michigan at about the same time, living next to each other in Michigan, both marrying female last name of Irish, lends credence to their being closely related, probably brothers.

Varnis has child born in New York in 1831 and 1834, then the next one in Michigan in 1838. He apparently moved to Michigan in that 1834-38 time period.

Varnis appears twice on the Oakland County land records: 14 June 1843 Varnie Maxfield purchased from David Irish 40 acres. 10 Jun 1855 Varnis Maxfield quit claims to Manly Irish (son of David). David died in 8 Jan 1855 so this quit claim may have had something to do with settling David's estate.

Also on the 1840 census D (David) Irish and L (Liberty) Irish appear as the two households just prior to the Hiram and Varnis households.
 
Maxfield, Varnis (I3636)
 
359 Appears in 1840 census living next to Varnis Maxfield in Groveland Twp. Varnis & Hiram appear in legal notice in 1837 New York Newspaper, as "residents of Michigan". There ages, both born in New Hampshire, both moving from New York to Michigan at about the same time, living next to each other in Michigan, both marrying females last name of Irish, lends credence to their being closely related, probably brothers.

Hiram has child born in New York in 1833 and is in Michigan by 1837.

Also on the 1840 census D (David) Irish and L (Liberty) Irish appear as the two households just prior to the Hiram and Varnis households.
 
Maxfield, Hiram (I5442)
 
360 Appears in the 1910 census twice 0n apr 15 in Cheboyban and on apr 28 in Arenac Kittle, Elwin (I2346)
 
361 Appears on 1880 cenus in household of Jerome Phelps. Listed as son. I believe this should be nephew. His marriage record lists Leander and Kate as parents. Also 1870 census list middle initial of 'A'. I also believe that is an error. Phelps, Reuben E (I2349)
 
362 appears on census dated 13 Jun 1900. Wife remarried on 4 Sep 1901. Caruthers, Leander {Lee} (I3983)
 
363 appears to be error Osborne, William E (I1263)
 
364 Appleton Highland Memorial Park Dalke, John (I117)
 
365 Arterioclerostic heart disease/ heart attack Willett, Dale Clinton (I970)
 
366 Article in “History of Outagamie County- by Thomas Henry Ryan.

AUGUST ROTHLESBERGER, one of the progressive, up-to-date farmers of Seymour township, who has made his own way in the world and made a place for himself among the successful men of his section through hard work and a determination to succeed, was born October 25, 1856, at Port Washington, Ozaukee county, Wisconsin, a son of John and Matilda (Wachter) Rothlesberger, natives of Germany. The parents of Mr. Rothlesberger were farming people and their first property was located at Fredonia, where they resided seven years, then moving to Batavia. They continued to reside at this place until locating in Seymour Township, settling on 120 acres of wild land, where they continued to live during the remainder of their lives. Mr. Rothlesberger's death occurred in 1898, when he was sixty-nine years old, and the mother passed away in 1904. They had the following children: August, George, William, Barney, Minnie, Lydia and Allie.

August Rothlesberger was the oldest of his parents' children, and as soon as he was able to reach the plow handles he was given his share of duties to perform on the home farm. He was reared to the life of an agriculturist and experienced all of the hard, unremitting toil of breaking in a new country, and no time was given him to acquire an education. Much observation, however, has given him a store of knowledge not to be gained in books, and he has never found that the lack of schooling interfered in any way with his ambition to succeed. When he purchased the old homestead it was graced with a little shanty and a log barn, but he soon added eighty acres to the original forty, built a fine house and a barn 40x100 feet, and settled down to general farming. Mr. Rothlesberger has one of the finest herds of Holstein cattle to be found in Outagamie County, and he makes on an average of 145 pounds of butter each week. His barn is equipped with all modern improvements as to sanitary needs and cleanliness, and includes the James patent stalls and stanchions.

In 1890 Mr. Rothlesberger was married to Josie Schimmelpfennig, daughter of August and Minnie Schimmelpfennig, and three children have been born to this union, namely: Ella, August and Hulda.
 
Rothlesberger, August (I718)
 
367 at sea Wise, John (I5139)
 
368 at sea Weller, Mary (I5300)
 
369 Atlantic Ocean Smith, Thomas (I6499)
 
370 Aug 14, 1876 Ida Irish female born Fairgrove parents William & Henrietta Irish of Fairgrove born NY & NY farmer DOR May 28 1877

unable to find death record in tuscola for a ida abell

family tree for ida m irish able dob 8/14/1878 married james burley fryers (his 5th) in 1927. dod 1957. unable to find marr or death record in gen cty. 
Irish, Ida (I338)
 
371 Augusta County marriage records show that he married Margret Jackson on 17 Dec 1805.

Revolutionary War Pension for James Caruthers, as found on footnote.com shows he entered the service from Staunton, Augusta County, Virginia, although he later moved to Blount County, Tennessee. He was born 5 April 1760. He died 13 Jan 1846 and his widow Margaret (born 1 June 1769) applied for widow’s pension. The application states they married in 1806 in Augusta County, although no marriage record was able to be found in Augusta County at the time of the application. The information in this pension file is entirely consistent with the marriage record of 17 Dec 1805 which was later found in Augusta County.

The pension file furthur states; “He was born in Chester County State of Pennsylvania on the 5th day of April in the year 1760. And at the early age of about 10 years moved with his father’s family to Augusta County, Virginia, where he resided at the time he was called into service.”

The 1820 US Census shows Elizabeth Caruthers living in Staunton, Augusta County. We would assume that the family home was also in Staunton at the beginning of the revolution. (1810 census only gives County, 1800 and 1790 are lost)

It seems quite likely that these records all refer to the same person and the real question is; how is James Caruthers related to John? 33 years older than John would seem to rule out being a brother, perhaps James is a brother to David, his father. As to marrying a Jackson, did the two brothers marry two sisters? Also note the reference to Samuel Jackson in James Caruthers’ will. There was also a reference to a Samuel Jackson in David Caruthers will.

It would seem that it is extremely likely that this James is related to our David, perhaps as a brother, perhaps as a cousin? 
Caruthers, James (I4761)
 
372 AUGUSTA COUNTY, VIRGINIA - CHALKLEY'S CHRONICLES; Vol 3, PP 220 - 229
Page 311.--6th March, 1803. David Jackson's will--To wife, Margaret;
to son, John; son, Samuel; daughter, Margaret; daughter, Elizabeth
Corothers; daughter, Jane Phillips; son, David; son, Thomas. Executors, sons
David Carothers, John Jackson. Teste: William Bell, William and Joseph
Wilson. Proved, 28th November, 1803, and executors qualify. 
Jackson, Elizabeth (I4002)
 
373 AUGUSTA COUNTY, VIRGINIA - CHALKLEY'S CHRONICLES; Vol 3, PP 220 - 229
Page 311.--6th March, 1803. David Jackson's will--To wife, Margaret;
to son, John; son, Samuel; daughter, Margaret; daughter, Elizabeth
Corothers; daughter, Jane Phillips; son, David; son, Thomas. Executors, sons
David Carothers, John Jackson. Teste: William Bell, William and Joseph
Wilson. Proved, 28th November, 1803, and executors qualify. 
Jackson, David (I4151)
 
374 Available at the Montour County Genealogical Society in Danville and the Columbia County Historical & Genealogical Society in Bloomsburg Source (S315)
 
375 Avon United Cemetery, Avon, Middlesex County, Ontario, Canada VanNorman, Harriet Rebecca (I7034)
 
376 Avondale Ballance, William H (I4013)
 
377 Baldwin, Martha. <i>Our Pioneers: Families of Early Oakland County, Michigan</i>. Originally published in 1888 with an addendum published in 1917. Source (S566)
 
378 bap 12/18/1831 Hider, Elizabeth (I3737)
 
379 bap 17 Jan 1836 Hider, Peter John (I3738)
 
380 bap 7/14/1822 Hider, Mary Ann (I3741)
 
381 bap 8 Sep 1839 Hider, James (I3740)
 
382 baptised as Annatie Ruiter at the Dutch Reform Church in Schaghticoke, Rensselaer, New York, USA Ruiter, Hannah (I7032)
 
383 baptism Hills, William (I1728)
 
384 baptism Stanley, Thomas (I3434)
 
385 baptism Tritton, Daniel (I4388)
 
386 baptism Stanley, John (I4426)
 
387 baptism Stanley, Timothy (I4427)
 
388 Baptism Allen, Thomas (I4539)
 
389 Baptism Allen, John (I4540)
 
390 baptism Allen, Eunice (I4541)
 
391 baptism Allen, Ruhameh (I4542)
 
392 baptism Stanley, Patience (I4551)
 
393 baptism date Wise, Abigail (I99)
 
394 baptism date Dewey, Thomas (I139)
 
395 baptism date Griswold, Edward (I235)
 
396 baptism date Hosford, John (I277)
 
397 baptism date Phelps, Nathaniel (I622)
 
398 baptism date Phelps, William (I654)
 
399 baptism date Ford, Hepzibah (I1094)
 
400 baptism date Lyman, Richard (I1106)
 
401 baptism date Lyman, Sarah (I1108)
 
402 baptism date Lyman, Anne (I1111)
 
403 baptism date Lyman, William (I1112)
 
404 baptism date Hosford, Hester (I1142)
 
405 baptism date Griswold, Ann (I1547)
 
406 baptism date Griswold, Deborah (I1548)
 
407 baptism date White, Anna (I1595)
 
408 baptism date Vessey, Sybil (I1597)
 
409 baptism date Griswold, Samuel (I1611)
 
410 baptism date Griswold, John (I1612)
 
411 baptism date Barber, Thomas (I1624)
 
412 baptism date Phelps, Samuel (I1628)
 
413 baptism date Phelps, Samuel (I1641)
 
414 baptism date Phelps, Sara (I1703)
 
415 baptism date Phelps, John (I1704)
 
416 baptism date Lyman, Phyllis (I1723)
 
417 baptism date Lyman, Richard (I1725)
 
418 baptism date Ford, Joanna (I1731)
 
419 baptism date Ford, Abigail (I1732)
 
420 baptism date Ford, Thomas (I1734)
 
421 baptism date Ford, Hannah (I1736)
 
422 baptism date Phelps, Cornelius (I1739)
 
423 baptism date Phelps, Mary (I1742)
 
424 baptism date Dewey, Anna (I1748)
 
425 baptism date Dewey, Israel (I1750)
 
426 baptism date Dewey, Jedediah (I1752)
 
427 baptism date Hayward, Florence (I1755)
 
428 baptism date Lyman, Judith (I1788)
 
429 baptism date Lyman, Jane (I1789)
 
430 baptism date Lyman, Henry (I1790)
 
431 baptism date Lyman, Agnes (I1791)
 
432 baptism date Lyman, Sarah (I1792)
 
433 baptism date Culver, Hannah (I1807)
 
434 baptism date Eames, Millicent (I1812)
 
435 baptism date Eames, Mark (I1838)
 
436 baptism date Eames, John (I1841)
 
437 baptism date Eames, Persis (I1842)
 
438 baptism date Eames, Margery (I1844)
 
439 baptism date Lounsbury, William Barker (I1887)
 
440 baptism date Porter, Anna (I3448)
 
441 baptism date Porter, Sara (I3449)
 
442 baptism date Porter, James (I3450)
 
443 baptism date Porter, Rebecca (I3451)
 
444 baptism date Porter, Samuel (I3452)
 
445 baptism date Porter, Rose (I3453)
 
446 baptism date Porter, Samuel Sr (I3454)
 
447 baptism date Porter, Mary (I3455)
 
448 baptism date Allgar, Bridget (I3457)
 
449 baptism date White, Mary (I3459)
 
450 baptism date White, Bridget (I3460)
 
451 baptism date White, Nathaniel (I3462)
 
452 baptism date White, Sarah (I3464)
 
453 baptism date White, Elisabeth (I3465)
 
454 baptism date Allgar, Mary (I3466)
 
455 baptism date Allgar, John (I3467)
 
456 baptism date Allgar, John (I3468)
 
457 baptism date Allgar, Elizabeth (I3469)
 
458 baptism date Hider, Peter (I3721)
 
459 baptism date Hider, William (I3735)
 
460 baptism date Hider, Harriet (I3736)
 
461 baptism date Hider, Millie (I3743)
 
462 baptism date Hider, Philadelphia (I3744)
 
463 baptism date Hider, Sarah (I3745)
 
464 baptism date Hider, Sophia (I3746)
 
465 baptism date Hider, Thomas (I3748)
 
466 baptism date Hider, Ann (I3749)
 
467 baptism date Hider, Edward (I3750)
 
468 baptism date Hider, Exeter (I3751)
 
469 baptism date Hider, James (I3752)
 
470 baptism date Hider, John (I3753)
 
471 baptism date Hider, Josiah (I3755)
 
472 baptism date Pendred, John George (I3765)
 
473 baptism date Hider, Ann (I4164)
 
474 baptism date Hider, Sarah (I4166)
 
475 baptism date Hider, Sophia (I4167)
 
476 baptism date Cooke, Aaron (I4546)
 
477 baptism date Stanley, Ruth (I4549)
 
478 baptism date Stanley, Freegift (I4550)
 
479 baptism date Pendred, Charlotte (I4570)
 
480 baptism date Pendred, John (I4572)
 
481 baptism date Pendred, Ann Groom (I4573)
 
482 baptism date Pendred, Groom (I4574)
 
483 baptism date Pendred, Groom (I4575)
 
484 baptism date Pendred, Sarah Harriet (I4582)
 
485 baptism date Pendred, Joseph Edward (I4583)
 
486 baptism date Pendred, Charlotte Annie (I4585)
 
487 baptism date Wise, Elizabeth (I4657)
 
488 baptism date Greswold, George (I4768)
 
489 baptism date Porter, Margaret (I4946)
 
490 baptism date Vessey, John (I4949)
 
491 baptism date Vessey, Susan (I4952)
 
492 baptism date Lyman, Richard (I4959)
 
493 baptism date Culver, Joseph (I4970)
 
494 baptism date Burrows, Jeremiah (I4981)
 
495 baptism date Burrows, Isaac (I4982)
 
496 baptism date Swift, Esther (I5185)
 
497 baptism date Dewey, Mindwell (I5434)
 
498 baptism date Fitz Randolph, Edward (I5503)
 
499 baptism date Henrich, Anna Elisabeth (I5625)
 
500 baptism date Henrich, Catharina Margaretha (I5627)
 

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