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 #   Notes   Linked to 
1  Phelps, William (I2285)
 
2  Irish, Clarence (I2540)
 
3  Storrs, Charles Frederick (I2652)
 
4  Irish, Jedediah (I3979)
 
5  Schultz, Ida Muriel (I4608)
 
6  Irish, Mary Jane (I5174)
 
7  Kile, Albert A (I5807)
 
8 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I5845)
 
9  Griswold, Mary (I5849)
 
10  Baumgaertner, Johannes (I5888)
 
11  Gordon, Stephen (I6027)
 
12  Shultz, Eve (I6094)
 
13  Martin, Ann Rhodes (I6360)
 
14 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I9932)
 
15

FIND-A-GRAVE
Elkins, Gage Lee- of Davison, MI., passed away May 31, 2020 at Hurley Hospital in Flint, MI. Gage is the beloved son of Jeffery Elkins and Angela Duehring. He is survived by his mother, Angie Duehring; father, Jeff Elkins; grandparents, Tracy and Steven Malik; Lisa Duehring; great grandparents, Darwin Kodat; Eunice and Dale Wright; Aunts, Dana Duehring, Teresa (DJ) Brown; Uncle Greg and Aunt Amy Elkins; several great aunts and uncles; cousins. He was preceded in death by his grandpa, Dennis (Papa) Duehring and grandfather, Marvin Elkins.

GAGE'S OBITUARY-allenfuneralhome.com
Elkins, Gage of Davison, age 17, passed away May 31, 2020. Cremation has taken place. A Memorial Service will be held at a later date. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the family.
Gage was born in Grand Blanc, MI on March 29, 2003, the son of Jeffery Elkins and Angela Duehring. He loved spending time with his cousins and his family. Gage enjoyed playing basketball with his father, best friend David, and brother Vann. He was an amazing person that will be missed by all who knew him and loved him.
Gage is survived by his mother, Angie; father, Jeff (Mindy) Elkins; brother, Vann; grandparents, Tracy and Steven Malik, Lisa Duehring; great-grandparents, Darwin Kodat, Eunice and Dale Wright; Aunts, Dana, Teresa (DJ) Brown, Uncle, Greg and Aunt, Amy Elkins, several cousins, extended family members and friends.

Mlive.com 6/3/2020-
DAVISON, MI - A 17-year-old hit and killed early Sunday morning by a train in Davison has been identified.
A preliminary investigation by law enforcement officials has revealed Gage Elkins was near the railroad tracks when a westbound CN train hit him as he attempted to cross the tracks near Main Street.
Officers with the Davison, Davison Township and Richfield Township police departments as well as the Genesee County Sheriff’s Office responded shortly after 4:15 a.m. May 31 for a 911 call of a personal injury accident involving a pedestrian who’d been hit by a train.
Elkins was transported to Hurley Medical Center in Flint. He was later pronounced deceased at the hospital.
Davison police Chief Don Harris said Elkins was headed home with a 15-year-old friend.
The pair had been at another friend’s home in Davison before they left.
Harris called it a “tragic, tragic accident.”
He noted it is difficult for people to judge the speed of trains, especially at night with no clear reference points.
“This was a big freight train, speeds were around 40, 45 mph,” said Harris “The train blew all its appropriate air horns at the certain locations it was supposed to.”
An obituary <https://www.allenfuneralhomeinc.com/obituary/gage-elkins> for Elkins said the teen “loved spending time with his cousins and his family.” “Gage enjoyed playing basketball with his father, best friend David, and brother Vann,” per the obituary. “He was an amazing person that will be missed by all who knew him and loved him.”

Multiple railroad crossings were closed for more than one hour to allow for the preliminary investigation.
CN Railroad Police also responded and assisted at the scene.
 
Elkins, Gage Lee (I9500)
 
16
 
Felsing, Frieda Margaret (I6052)
 
17
1766 Kuhlberg List #3557
The Luebeck Ship, Skipper Wiebe Heinrichson 8 Aug 1766
Conrad Herbel
Luth, farmer from Braunfels
Wife: Anna
Children: Johann 16, Christian 5, Martin 2, Maria 14

1766-1767 Transport List #1
Conrad Herbel, Luth
Wife: Anna Elisabeth died enroute
Children: Johann Peter 17, Christian 6,
Johann Martin 2 ¼ died enroute, Maria Catrina 15

1767 Kukkus First Settler List #27
Konrad Herbel
Age 40, ref, weaver of stockings from Belchingen, Braunfels
Wife: Anna Maria 40
Children: Johann Peter 17, Maria Katharina 15
Step sons: Jakob 12, Philipp 9
Stepdaughter: Elisabeth 15

Two children apparently did not survive the transport to Kukkus. And 3 stepchildren were added. Perhaps his wife also died and he remarried another Anna.

Name Konrad Herbel, from Bechlingen, Braunfels appears in Solms-Braunfels Archives asking to be allowed to leave for Volga Russia in 1766.

Stumpp has Konrad Herbel from Bechlingen/Wetzlar, Hesse.
 
Herpel, Johann Konrad (I9371)
 
18
2 weeks old on 1767 census.

Description: Kukkus birth records include the following:
#31, 32. Twins Cath. Magd. [Catharina Magdalena] and Maria Charl. [Charlotta] Beker [Becker], born 13, baptized 20 November 1799.
Parents: Conrad Beker and Catharina Haase from the village Volskoye.
Godparents and witnesses: Joh. Horch, Magd. Beker, Thom. Heizenroeder, M. Charl. Fuchs.

HH 43 in 1798 - these are the parents
HH 42 contains Maria Charlotta Fuchs, a sponsor
HH 30 contains Thomas Hei..., another sponsor, married to Anna Margaretha Becker (my ancestors)
HH 31 has a Becker wife named Magdalena that I suspect is another sponsor

These sponsors might suggest that Maria Charlotta (Becker) Fuchs, Anna Margaretha (Becker) Hei..., and Wilhelm Becker were siblings of Johann Conrad Becker. We know from the 1811 Kukkus census HH43 that Konrad and Wilhelm were brothers. Most likely Anna Margaetha was the child on the 1767 1st settler list.

HH 24 in Stahl am Tarlyk has a Johannes Horch, but I don't see how he'd be connected. I suspect it must be some other Horch that perhaps had a Becker wife.
 
Becker, Anna Margareta (I3437)
 
19
Also, FindAGrave has a specific birth date on son James in Dutchess County 20 Aug 1793 and on son Cornelius in Junius 16 Oct 1795. I have no confirmation of either place or either date.
We do have a Quaker document which states brother Samuel was born in Esopus, Ulster County, NY in 1797.

In the 1800 Federal Census we find John Mills in New Paltz. The census has his age between 26 and 45, which fits with an age of approximate 30. The census show 4 males and zero females under the age of 10. We show 3 males and 0 females within that age range. (the number 4 in the males box is indistinct and could conceivably be a one. By comparing it with other 4’s on the page, I believe it to be a 4). There is 1 other Mills in Ulster County on the 1800 census, that is James Mills (incorrectly indexed on ancestry as James Miler) who is in Rochester. His age is over 45.

From the Marlborough Monthly Meeting: 24 Oct 1810 John Mills and wife Abigail of New Paltz, NY requested certificate of removal to the Adolphus Monthly meeting in Upper Canada.
From the Adolphus Monthly Meeting of women: 21 Mar 1811 The certificate from the Marlborough Meeting for Abigail Mills is accepted.
From the Adolphus Monthly Meeting of women:18 Jan 1816. Abigail Mills and her husband John requested a certificate of removal to the Junious (NY) Monthly meeting
From the Norwich (Hicksite) Meeting of women: 22 May 1820 Abigail Mills, wife of John Mills has her certificate of removal from the Junius (NY) Monthly Meeting accepted by the Norwich (Canada) Meeting.
From the Norwick Monthly Meeting of women: May 1830 Abigail Mill's name appears on a membership list. 
Minard, Abigail (I6989)
 
20
Donald Barnes Powell
BIRTH
17 Dec 1912
Frenchtown, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, USA
DEATH
19 Jan 2001 (aged 88)
Stuart, Martin County, Florida, USA
BURIAL
Fernhill Memorial Gardens and Mausoleum
Stuart, Martin County, Florida, USA
MEMORIAL ID
190587005 · View Source
MEMORIAL
PHOTOS 1
FLOWERS 0
Donald Barnes Powell, 88
OBITUARIES

Stuart News, The (FL) - Tuesday, January 23, 2001

STUART - Donald Barnes Powell, 88, of Stuart died Friday, Jan. 19, 2001, in Stuart Nursing & Restorative Care.

A native of Frenchtown, N.J., and lived in Stuart since 1974. He moved here from Oklahoma City.

He was a graduate of Denison University, Granville, Ohio.

Before retirement, he was an executive with Western Electric (AT&T), in the Chicago area and Oklahoma City.

He was a member of First United Methodist Church, where he sang in the choir.

He was a past commander of the St. Lucie River Power Squadron and a member of Phi Gamma Delta. In Oklahoma City, he was president of Goodwill Industries, Junior Achievement and Oklahoma City Beautiful; and vice president of the Urban League and League for the Blind.

He was predeceased by a wife, Katherine Kelly Powell.

Survivors include his wife of 20 years, Patricia McMaken Powell of Stuart; a daughter, Judith Jayne Fogel and husband E. James of Ithaca, N.Y.; two sons, Richard Barnes Powell and wife Sandra of New Mexico and Douglas Craig Powell and wife Kelly of California; two sisters, Lois Holth of Stuart and Eleanor Mears and husband Norman of Stuart and St. Paul; two stepdaughters, Terry Lynn D'Angelo of Charlevoix, Mich., and Suzanne Walden of Stuart; six grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; four stepgrandchildren; and six stepgreat-grandchildren. 
Powell, Donald Barnes (I10463)
 
21 !st Cousin once removed marriage. We have more DNA matches than expected down this line. Losee, Mary Jane (I7486)
 
22 !st husband Matthew Grinnell
2nd husband Anthony Paine
3rd husband James Weeden

She had children with Matthew Grinnellm Matthew, Thomas, Daniel and a daughter.
No known children with the other 2 husbands. 
Unknown, Rose Grinnell Weeden (I8680)
 
23 "Ancestors and descendants of Jonathan Abell" by Horace Abell pub 1933 gives Isabelle Keller as the wife of the immigrant Thomas Morehouse.
Per "ANCESTRY AND DESCENDANTS OF GERSHOM MOREHOUSE JR., OF REDDING, CONNECTICUT, A CAPTAIN IN THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION" Isabel may have been a 2nd wife and not the mother of the children. 
Unknown, Isabel (I6500)
 
24 "Michigan Digital Archive Collection", State of Michigan, Archives of Michigan Digital Collections (http://haldigitalcollections.cdmhost.com/cdm4/search.php). Source (S363)
 
25 "Michigan Digital Archive Collection". Images and Transcrioptions. State of Michigan. Archives of Michigan Digital Collections. http://haldigitalcollections.cdmhost.com/cdm4/search.php : Death Records 1897-1920. Source (S10)
 
26 "now since 29 years, and has not had a child, 11/3/1660" NEHGS 1851 V5 P230 Wilson, Isabel (I311)
 
27 "slain by the indians at Sudbury" Howe, John (I7261)
 
28 #50 Spring/Summer 2010 pdf at http://lounsbury-tree.blogspot.com/ Source (S112)
 
29 <i>1841 Census Returns</i>. London, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO). HO 107 Census Returns. Source (S451)
 
30 <i>California, San Francisco Area Funeral Home Records, 1835-1931</i>. Salt Lake City, Utah: FamilySearch, 2013. Source (S364)
 
31 <i>Census Returns of England and Wales, 1841</i>. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1841. Data imaged from the National Archives, London, England. The National Archives gives no warranty as to the accuracy, completeness or fitness for the purpose of the information provided. Images may be used only for purposes of research, private study or education. Applications for any other use should be made to the National Archives, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 4DU. Source (S135)
 
32 <i>Census Returns of England and Wales, 1851</i>. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1851. Data imaged from the National Archives, London, England. The National Archives gives no warranty as to the accuracy, completeness or fitness for the purpose of the information provided. Images may be used only for purposes of research, private study or education. Applications for any other use should be made to the National Archives, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 4DU. Source (S366)
 
33 <i>Census Returns of England and Wales, 1861</i>. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1861. Data imaged from The National Archives, London, England. The National Archives gives no warranty as to the accuracy, completeness or fitness for the purpose of the information provided. Images may be used only for purposes of research, private study or education. Applications for any other use should be made to The National Archives, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 4DU. Source (S159)
 
34 <i>Census Returns of England and Wales, 1871</i>. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1871. Data imaged from the National Archives, London, England. The National Archives gives no warranty as to the accuracy, completeness or fitness for the purpose of the information provided. Images may be used only for purposes of research, private study or education. Applications for any other use should be made to the National Archives, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 4DU. Source (S157)
 
35 <i>Census Returns of England and Wales, 1881</i>. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1881. <p>Images © Crown copyright. Images reproduced by courtesy of The National Archives, London, England.</p> <p>The National Archives give no warranty as to the accuracy, completeness or fitness for the purpose of the information provided.</p> <p>Images may be used only for purposes of research, private study or education. Applications for any other use should be made to <a href="http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/imagelibrary/" target="_blank">The National Archives Image Library</a>, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 4DU, Tel: 020 8392 5225 Fax: 020 8392 5266.</p> Source (S372)
 
36 <i>Census Returns of England and Wales, 1891</i>. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1891. <p>Data imaged from The National Archives, London, England. 2,131 rolls. The National Archives gives no warranty as to the accuracy, completeness or fitness for the purpose of the information provided. Images may be used only for purposes of research, private study or education. Applications for any other use should be made to The National Archives, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 4DU.</p> Source (S381)
 
37 <i>Census Returns of England and Wales, 1901</i>. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives, 1901. Data imaged from the National Archives, London, England. The National Archives gives no warranty as to the accuracy, completeness or fitness for the purpose of the information provided. Images may be used only for purposes of research, private study or education. Applications for any other use should be made to the National Archives, Kew, Richmond, Surrey TW9 4DU. Source (S403)
 
38 <i>Church of England Parish Registers, 1538-1812</i>. London, England: London Metropolitan Archives. <p>Images produced by permission of the City of London Corporation Libraries, Archives. The City of London gives no warranty as to the accuracy, completeness or fitness for the purpose of the information provided. Images may be used only for purposes of research, private study or education. Applications for any other use should be made to the City of London, Guildhall, PO Box 270, London, EC2P 2EJ. Infringement of the above condition may result in legal action.</p> Source (S397)
 
39 <i>Find A Grave</i>. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi. Source (S259)
 
40 <i>Find A Grave</i>. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi: accessed 1 February 2013. Source (S167)
 
41 <i>Find A Grave</i>. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi: accessed 1 February 2013. Source (S184)
 
42 <i>Find A Grave</i>. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi: accessed 18 January 2013. Source (S118)
 
43 <i>Find A Grave</i>. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi: accessed 25 January 2013. Source (S145)
 
44 <i>Find A Grave</i>. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi: accessed 4 February 2013. Source (S296)
 
45 <i>Germany, Marriages, 1558-1929</i>. Salt Lake City, Utah: FamilySearch, 2013. Source (S446)
 
46 <i>Historic Pennsylvania Church and Town Records</i>. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Historical Society of Pennsylvania. <p><i>Methodist Church Records</i>. Valley Forge, Pennsylvania: Eastern Pennsylvania United Methodist Church Commission on Archives and History.</p> Source (S346)
 
47 <i>Iowa, Marriages</i>. Salt Lake City, Utah: FamilySearch, 2013. Source (S374)
 
48 <i>Missouri Marriage Records</i>. Jefferson City, MO, USA: Missouri State Archives. Microfilm. Source (S353)
 
49 <i>Records of the Internal Revenue Service. </i>Record Group 58. The National Archives at Washington, DC. <p><a href="/search/dbextra.aspx?dbid=1264">See Full Source Citations</a>.</p> Source (S428)
 
50 <i>Rochester City Directory, 1890</i>. Rochester, NY, USA: R. L. Polk Co., 1890. Source (S537)
 
51 <i>Selected Passenger and Crew Lists and Manifests</i>. National Archives, Washington, D.C.<p><a href="/search/dbextra.aspx?dbid=7949">View all sources</a>.</p> Source (S430)
 
52 <i>Selected Passenger and Crew Lists and Manifests</i>. National Archives, Washington, D.C.<p><br>A full list of sources can be found <a href="/search/dbextra.aspx?dbid=8722">here</a>.</p> Source (S514)
 
53 <i>Selected Passports</i>. National Archives, Washington, D.C.<p><br>A full list of sources can be found <a href="/search/dbextra.aspx?dbid=1174">here</a>.</p> Source (S429)
 
54 <i>The Charles R. Hale Collection</i>. <i>Hale Collection of Connecticut Cemetery Inscriptions.</i> Hartford, Connecticut: Connecticut State Library. Source (S308)
 
55 <i>The Dayton Obituary Index</i>. Dayton Metro Library. http://www.daytonmetrolibrary.org/hobits-search: accessed 13 November 2013. Source (S331)
 
56 <i>The Obituary Daily Times</i>. The Obituary Daily Times. http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~obituary. Source (S189)
 
57 <i>U.S. Census Mortality Schedules, New York, 1850-1880.</i> Microfilm, M1-M15, 15 rolls. New York State Education Department, Office of Cultural Education. New York State Library, Albany, New York. Source (S529)
 
58 <i>Voter Registration Lists, Public Record Filings, Historical Residential Records, and Other Household Database Listings</i>. Source (S188)
 
59 <i>Voter Registration Lists, Public Record Filings, Historical Residential Records, and Other Household Database Listings</i>. Source (S211)
 
60 <i>Warwickshire Anglican Registers</i>. Warwick, England: Warwickshire County Record Office. Source (S341)
 
61 <p><i>California Naturalizations</i>.California State Archives, Sacramento, California.</p> Source (S32)
 
62 <p><i>Consolidated Lists of Civil War Draft Registrations, 1863-1865</i>. NM-65, entry 172, 620 volumes. Records of the Provost Marshal General’s Bureau (Civil War), Record Group 110. National Archives, Washington D.C.</p> Source (S336)
 
63 <p><i>Ontario, Canada, Select Marriages</i>. Archives of Ontario, Toronto</p><p><br>A full list of sources can be found <a href="/search/dbextra.aspx?dbid=7921">here</a>.</p> Source (S218)
 
64 <p><i>Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1820-1897. </i> Microfilm Publication M237, 675 rolls. NAI: <a href="http://research.archives.gov/description/6256867" target="_blank">6256867</a>. Records of the U.S. Customs Service, Record Group 36. National Archives at Washington, D.C.</p> <p><i>Passenger and Crew Lists of Vessels Arriving at New York, New York, 1897-1957.</i> Microfilm Publication T715, 8892 rolls. NAI: <a href="http://research.archives.gov/description/300346" target="_blank">300346</a>. Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service; National Archives at Washington, D.C.</p> <p><i>Supplemental Manifests of Alien Passengers and Crew Members Who Arrived on Vessels at New York, New York, Who Were Inspected for Admission, and Related Index, compiled 1887-1952.</i> Microfilm Publication A3461, 21 rolls. NAI: <a href="http://research.ar Source (S375)
 
65 <p><i>Passenger Lists, 1865–1935</i>. Microfilm Publications T-479 to T-520, T-4689 to T-4874, T-14700 to T-14939, C-4511 to C-4542. Library and Archives Canada, n.d. RG 76-C. Department of Employment and Immigration fonds. Library and Archives Canada Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.</p> Source (S362)
 
66 <p><i>Septennial Census Returns, 1779–1863</i>. Box 1026, microfilm, 14 rolls. Records of the House of Representatives. Records of the General Assembly, Record Group 7. Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, Harrisburg, PA.</p> Source (S567)
 
67 <p><li>Montana State Genealogical Society, comp. <i>Montana Death Index, 1860-2007</i>. Montana State Genealogical Society, Lewis & Clark Library, 120 S Last Chance Gulch, Helena, MT 59620. Copyright 2008.</li></p><p><li>State of Montana, comp. <i>Montana State Death Registry Index, 1907-1953.</i> Montana State Genealogical Society, Montana.</li></p><p><li>State of Montana, comp. <i>Montana Death Index, 1954-2002.</i> State of Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services, Office of Vital Statistics, Helena, Montana.</li></p> Source (S393)
 
68 <p>"Michigan Deaths and Burials, 1800–1995." Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2009, 2010. Index entries derived from digital copies of original and compiled records.</p> Source (S231)
 
69 <p>"Ohio Births and Christenings, 1821-1962." Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2009, 2011. Index entries derived from digital copies of original and compiled records.</p> Source (S681)
 
70 <p>Death Records. Michigan Department of Community Health, Division for Vital Records and Health Statistics, Lansing, Michigan.</p> Source (S174)
 
71 <p>Iowa Department of Public Health. Iowa Marriage Records, 1880–1922. Textual Records. State Historical Society of Iowa, Des Moines, Iowa.</p> <p>Iowa Department of Public Health. Iowa Marriage Records, 1923–37. Microfilm. Record Group 048. State Historical Society of Iowa, Des Moines, Iowa.</p> Source (S347)
 
72 <p>Texas Department of State Health Services. Texas Death Certificates, 1903–1982. iArchives, Orem, Utah.</p> Source (S471)
 
73 <p>United States, Selective Service System. <i>Selective Service Registration Cards, World War II: Fourth Registration</i>. Records of the Selective Service System, Record Group Number 147. National Archives and Records Administration. </p> <p><a href="/search/dbextra.aspx?dbid=1002">Full Source Citation</a>.</p> Source (S379)
 
74 <Table Border=”1”><tr><th>State <th>Citation</th></tr><tr><td></td><td>United States. <I>Federal Mortality Census Schedules, 1850-1880 (formerly in the custody of the Daughters of the American Revolution), and Related Indexes, 1850-1880.</I> T655, 30 rolls. National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D.C. </td><tr><td><b>Alabama</b></td><td>United States. <i>U.S. Census Mortality Schedules, Alabama, 1850-1880</i> Alabama State Department of Archives & History, Montgomery, Alabama</td><tr><td><b>Arkansas</b></td><td>United States. <i>Eighth census of the United States, 1860, Arkansas, mortality</i> and <i>Tenth census of the United States, 1880, Arkansas, mortality</i> [microform] F410.C46 1850a, 1860a, 1870a, 1880a. University of Arkansas Libraries, Fayetteville, Arkansas</td><tr><td>&l Source (S74)
 
75 <ul><li><i>Census of 1851 (Canada East, Canada West, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia)</i>. Library and Archives Canada, Ottawa, Canada.</li><li><i>Census of Nova Scotia, 1851</i>. Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada: Nova Scotia Archives and Records Management (NSARM): Nova Scotia Board of Statistics, 1851.</li></ul><p>NS Archives and Records Management gives no warranty as to the accuracy, completeness or fitness for the purpose of the information provided. Images may be used only for purposes of research, private study or education. Infringement of this condition may result in legal action.</p><br><p>Images are reproduced with the permission of Library and Archives Canada.</p> Source (S166)
 
76 <ul><li>1870 U.S. census, population schedules. NARA microfilm publication M593, 1,761 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.</li><li>Minnesota census schedules for 1870. NARA microfilm publication T132, 13 rolls. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.</li></ul> Source (S4)
 
77 <ul><li>Archives of Ontario. <i>Registrations of Deaths, 1869-1938.</i> MS 935, reels 1-615. Archives of Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.</li><li>Archives of Ontario. <i>Registrations of Ontario Overseas Deaths, 1939-1947.</i> MS 944, reels 1-11. Archives of Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.</li><li>Archives of Ontario. <i>Division Registrar Vital Statistics Records, 1858-1930.</i> MS 940, reels 5-10, 16, 21, 26-27. Archives of Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.</li></ul> Source (S248)
 
78 <http://family.phelpsinc.com/phelpsfam/d0012/f0000027.html> <http://family.phelpsinc.com/phelpsfam/d0012/f0000027.html>Maj. Gen. Noah Phelps <http://family.phelpsinc.com/phelpsfam/d0012/f0000027.html>(1) (born January 22, 1740, descended from the immigrant William Phelps) settled in Simsbury, Connecticut., where he was an active and influential man. He was a Yale graduate, a justice of the Peace, judge of Probate for twenty years, and was a Delegate to the Convention of 1787 to ratify the Federal Constitution. Early in the breaking out of the Revolutionary War he was chosen as a member of "Committee of War for the expedition against Ticonderoga and Crown Point."
The committee considered the advisability of taking Fort Ticonderoga, then occupied by the British, and in which there was stored a large amount of heavy artillery and other war implements. Capt. Phelps, Barnard Romance, Ephraim Buell, and Capt. Edward Mott, with others, composed this committee, Capt. Mott acting as chairman. £300 was raised from the Public Treasury though guaranteed by several patriotic gentlemen. This fund was placed in the hands of Capt. Phelps and Barnard Romance, with the request that they should go north and press forward this project. This resulted in the great and bloodless victory - the taking of Fort Ticonderoga.
It may be interesting to his descendants to know the part Capt. Phelps acted as a spy. At the southern part of Lake Champlain, Capt. Phelps was sent out to reconnoiter. He stopped over night at a farm house some little distance from Fort Ticonderoga. Some British soldiers occupied rooms adjoining Capt. Phelps, where they were having a dinner party. Capt. Phelps heard them discuss the condition of the fort, and the position taken by the rebels, as they styled the people. Early the next morning Capt. Phelps visited the fort disguised as a peddler.
"Pretending that his object was to get shaved, he avoided suspicion, and had an opportunity to ascertain the construction, strength, and force of the garrison. And he had the good fortune to elude detection, though as it afterwards appeared, his presence had began [sic] to excite mistrust before he left the garrison."
While returning through the fort, the commander accompanied him talking with him about the rebels, their object and movements. Capt. Phelps seeing a portion of the wall in a dilapidated condition, remarked that it would afford a feeble defence against the rebels, if they should attack in that quarter. The commander replied, " Yes, but that is not our greatest misfortune. All our powder is damaged, and before we can use it, we are obliged to dry and sift it."
The Phelps Homestead Erected by Captain Elisha Phelps in 1776, who with his brother, General Noah Phelps, and others, was actively engaged in the capture of Ft. Ticonderoga. After the death of Captain Phelps, this old homestead was purchased by his nephew, Colonel Noah Amherst Phelps. (1) It was operated by three sucessive generations of Phelps tavernkeepers as a tavern and inn from 1786 to 1849. The Simsbury Historical Society <../geo/simsbury.htm> now owns and operates the Phelps Tavern Museum and Homestead located on two-plus acres in the center of Simsbury, Connecticut.
Capt. Phelps soon after left the fort, employing a boatman to take him down the lake in a small boat. He entered the boat in full view and under the guns of the fort. He requested the boatman to exert himself and terminate the journey as soon as possible, The boatman then requested him to take an oar and assist, This the Capt. declined to do, being in full sight of the fort, by saying he was no boatman. After rounding a point that intercepted a view from the fort, the Capt. proposed taking an oar, which he did, and being a strong active man as well as a good oarsman, he excited the suspicion of the oarsman by his efficient work, who remarked with an oath, 'You have seen an oar before now, sir.' This excited the suspicion of the boatman at the time that he was not a good and loyal citizen, but fear of superior strength prevented an attempt to carry him back to the fort. This he confessed to Capt. Phelps after the surrender of the fort. Capt. Phelps returned safely to his command, reported the information he had gained [to General Ethan Allen], resulting in the great and glorious victory before referred to." (2)
About this time Mr. Phelps raised a company mostly at his own expense, and was appointed Captain. He served under Col. Ward, was at Fort Lee, joined Washington's army, and was at the battles of Trenton and Princeton. Later he acted as commissary, and after the war was chosen Maj. Gen. of Militia.
Noah Phelps was clearly a leader within the Simsbury community. He chaired the town meeting that passed the articles of confederation in January 1778, and in November of 1787, the meeting picked him and Daniel Humphrey Esq., as delegates for the Convention of the State of Connecticut, set to convene in Hartford in January and vote on whether or not to adopt the federal constitution. They were directed to oppose it, but "one of the delegates though voting as instructed by the town, took occasion to state that his personal convictions led him to favor the proposed constitution."(3) This might or might not have been Phelps. He held a variety of important positions, including Surveyor of lands in 1772 and 1783, Justice of the Peace for Hartford County in 1782, Judge of Probate in 1787, and Major-General of the Militia, 1796-1799.
He died in Simsbury 4 Nov., 1809, honored and respected. On his tombstone is inscribed: "A Patriot of 1776. To such we are indebted for our Independence."
 
Phelps, Noah (I10)
 
79 'Anna Hayden Married Israel Osborn of East Windsor' Family (F1568)
 
80 (I) John Trumbull, a cooper, came from Newcastle-on-Tyne to New England, and settled in Rowley, Massachusetts, in 1640. He was in Roxbury as early as 1639, and was a member of the Apostle John Eliot's church. He shortly removed, however, to Rowley, and his homestead was in the heart of that village, fronting on the common. He taught the first school in the town, was a freeman, May 13, 1640, selectman in 1650 and 1652, town clerk 1654 to 1656, and died in 1657. He was buried May 18 of that year. He married in England, in 1635, Eleanor Chandler, and brought his wife and a son John with him. Her name appears in the New England records as Ellen. She died about 1648-49, and he married (second) in August, 1650, Ann, widow of Michael Hopkinson, of Rowley. She survived him and married (third) March i, 1658, Richard Swan, as his second wife. She died in Rowley, and was buried April 5, 1678..

Children of first wife : John.

Ha nnah, born December 14, 1640 Judah, April 3, 1643 Ruth, February 23, 1645 Joseph...

Children of second marriage.

Abigail, born October 13, 1651 Mary, April 7, 1654.

From: New England Families, Genealogical and Memorial; a Record of the Achievements of Her People in the Founding of a Nation, Vol 5. by The American Historical Society
 
Trumbull, John (I4712)
 
81 (Online database: AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2002), Source (S319)
 
82 -Reformed Faith. foresterer from Pfalz, Alsbach place, arrived in Oranienbaum (not far from Saint Petersburg) on 8/8/1766 by the ship underthe command of Selender. They arrived in Kukkus Colony on 26 June 1767

1766 Kuhlberg List #3434
Unknown Luebeck ship, skipper Johann Gottfried Seelender 8 Aug 1766
Conrad Reitz
Ref, farmer from Pfalz.
Wife: Maria
Children: Johann 14, Catharina 9, Elisabeth 5

1767 Kukkus First Settler List #25
Konrad Reitz
Age 54, ref, forester from Alsbach, Kurpfalz
Wife: Maria Elisabeth 36
Son: Johannes 13

Apparently the two younger children did not survive the trip to Kukkus.
 
Reitz, Konrad (I3212)
 
83 0 Age: 0 Comstock, Agnes (I10368)
 
84 0 Age: 0 Comstock, Eva (I10372)
 
85 1 Age: 1 Comstock, Phebe Jane (I10360)
 
86 10/26/1824 Norbury, Heath (I6312)
 
87 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I6293)
 
88 11 days after, died Bissell, Ephraim (I3708)
 
89 11/12 is age on 1910 census in may 1910 Gordon, Capitola E (I6662)
 
90 12th Governor of Georgia--Signer of the Declaration of Independence

LYMAN HALL was born on April 12, 1724 in Wallingford, Connecticut. It was not in the state of his birth, however, that Hall would gain fame as a colonial congressman, but further south, in Georgia.
Hall studied for the ministry at Yale where he graduated in 1747 at the age of twenty-three. Soon after, he married Abigail Burr and subsequently decided he would rather heal unhealthy bodies than tainted souls. So he studied long and hard and by 1754 he was ready to practice medicine.
First he opened an office in South Carolina, then he and his family settled in Sunbury on the Georgia coast. As a dedicated doctor, Hall's practice expanded and prospered - so much so that he was financially able to acquire a vast and successful rice plantation in Burke County, Georgia.
While the Georgia legislature was at first reluctant to send a representative to the Second Continental congress in 1775, Lyman Hall was determined to change this posture. He called a citizen's meeting that was filled with patriots who outwardly supported his loud cry for total independence. Thus, he was elected as a delegate to congress. He had no authority to vote, however, until the following year when his appointment was confirmed by the Georgia legislature.
In 1776, two other representatives for Georgia joined Hall at the Old State House in Philadelphia. He was the oldest of these signers and the one who spoke out most forcefully for freedom and a breakaway from the rule of England.
During the Revolutionary War, while Hall was still serving in Congress, the British destroyed his beautiful plantation. Hall's family, however, managed to escape to the north, later joining him in Philadelphia.
In 1782, LymanHall retuned to Georgia, where he was elected to the office of governor. He served just one year before returning in 1784 to a new plantation.
Hall died on October 19, 1790 in Burke County, Georgia, at the age of sixty-six.

Lyman Hall
1724-1790
Representing Georgia at the Continental Congress
Born: April 12, 1724
Birthplace: Wallingford, Conn.
Education: Graduated Yale College, (Physician.)
Work: Elected to Continental Congress, 1775; Delegate to the Georgia House of Assembly, Elected Governor of Georgia, 1783; Judge, 1785.
Died: October 19, 1790
Lyman Hall was born in Connecticut in 1724. He studied medicine at Yale College, graduated in 1756 and went to Charleston, South Carolina, shortly after to establish a medical practice. He bought land in Georgia in 1760 and established a plantation there, while continuing to practice medicine. Two years later he returned to South Carolina, still as a physician. In 1774, by this time partisan in revolutionary politics, he again came to Georgia and earned the unflattering attention of the Royal Governor, James Wright. He also secured election to the Continental Congress, where he was involved in provisioning food and medicine for the Revolutionary Armies. He was reelected to congress through 1780 but retired to his adopted state in 1777 when state matters, including the situation of his longtime friend Button Gwinnett, demanded his attention. A short time later, the war reached Savannah. Hall's property was burned and he stood accused of high treason. He fled to Charleston, which was also overtaken by the British. He then fled to Connecticut, some say, where he was harbored by family.
He returned to Georgia in 1782, to reclaim his lands, was elected to the House of Assembly in 1783 and then elevated to the office of the Governor. After a single year as Governor, he served one more year in the Assembly, then a year as judge. He then returned to private life and was involved in the continued development of agriculture in the state. Hall died in 1790 at the age of 66.
 
Hall, Lyman (I3671)
 
91 13 Age: 13 Size, Donna Marie (I10330)
 
92 13 cM dna match with Judy, common ancestor William West/Lydia George beverlyhathaway1 (I4595)
 
93 14 Age: 14 Comstock, Upton (I10354)
 
94 1601 Wilson St Seeley, Herbert Henry (I5914)
 
95 166? Howe, Daniel (I7270)
 
96 1690 Langworthy, Andrew (I7680)
 
97 1691 Shattuck, Retire (I8049)
 
98 1697 Sweetman, Sarah (I8529)
 
99 17 May 1897 the family moved to the village Rozhdestvenskaje, the Akmalir Region (the Middle Asia) Reitz, Johannes (I1921)
 
100 17 year old Emily Shultz died 1 Jan 1865. She left behind 2 month old Albert Smith. Probate records show that Gearhart and Nancy Kile filed for guardianship over Albert Smith. When Albert reached adulthood he legally changed his name to Albert Kile. It is our belief that Nancy Kile, whose maiden name is Nancy Shultz (the daughter of Samuel Shultz and Mary Norberry of Columbia County, Pennsylvania) was an Aunt to Albert.

An interesting entry in a Tuscola County History book shows Mary, Sally, Albert and Emily Schultz as being in the first school class in Tuscola in 1853. See below:

http://www.interment.net/data/us/mi/tuscola/watrous/index.htm<br><br>http://www.usgennet.org/usa/mi/county/tuscola/hist/junfir.htmTaken from The History of Tuscola County, Biographical Sketches and Illustrations, H. R. Page Co., Chicago, 1883. Thanks to Bonnie Petee.<br>The first school in the town of Juniata was taught in the summer of 1853 by Miss Ellen E. Miller, now wife of Charles R. Seldon of Caro. The building used was a low log shanty, built by D. G. Wilder to live in, until he could construct a better habitation. It stood nealy opposite the present site of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in Watrousville. The following are the names of pupils who attended this first term of school: Sarah, Arvilla, and Eliza McGlone, George, Charles and Abraham Pettingill, Nancy, John and Dall Streeter, Jennie and James King, George Smith, Mary, Sally, Albert and Emily Schultz, Martha Huntley, Lemuel Gamble, Jonathan, Clarissa and Salmon Simons, Nelson and Dana Miller, and Anna Morrell.
 
Shultz, Emily (I5733)
 

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